The Expressed Doctrine of Buddhism & The Four Noble Truths

The Expressed Doctrine of Buddhism & The Four Noble Truths

Buddhism is a family of religious and metaphysical positions that are in some way originated from the instructions of Siddhartha Gautama, the historical Buddha. There is always a vulnerability of over-generalizing the homogeneousness of Buddhist views, but I attempt neither a comprehensive nor a comprehensive examination of Buddhist thought; I merely need to specify something of the Buddhist approach to the self. Prominently, I say little about the Four Noble Truths, even though Buddhism is chiefly a hands-on philosophy, not because they are inconsequential, but because my interest is predominantly with whether autonomy as an educational aim is consistent with a Buddhist notion of the self.

Eight eminent Brahmins who examined the birth of the prince declared that he would be a universal ruler or would retire from the worldly matters and become a Buddha. At the age of sixteen Prince Siddhartha married Princess Yasodhara and lived a content married life for thirteen years in deluxe conditions created by his father to shield him from the realities of life. However while being driven in his horse carriage outside the palace, on four subsequent days he saw an old man, a sickly man, a corpse, and an ascetic, four signs, which changed his worldly views, and he renounced the world in search of the Truth.

In the texts Buddha’s dogma is represented as a body of knowledge, expressed in schemes and rational sequences of ideas accessible to normal consciousness. To be sure, this familiarity has its source in an enhanced state of consciousness, in meditation. Though its inevitability springs from an extramundane vision of total self-extinction, the content of this certainty seems to be accessible to the normal understanding. Buddhist institution challenges and enriches the limited sense of realism that takes superiority in the dialogue between Buddhism and science. This challenge needs to be appreciated in order to portray Buddhism an equal partner in the dialogue rather than the measly object of scientific critique.

Buddha’s lessons communicate not suprasensory involvement but a body of rational thought. They divulge a love of concepts, abstractions, enumerations, and combinations, fully consonant with the Indian philosophical institutions on which it draws. But though Buddha’s doctrine is accessible to normal consciousness, it cannot be operative without suprasensory experience. The rational thinking of our finite mind is not an adequate vessel for it. The core of the doctrine is observed only by meditation, and rational formulation can give no more than a pale silhouette or intimation of it. The source and context of this doctrine must not be forgotten as we now turn to its simple rational expression.

The Four Noble Truths

Buddha’s vision of existence is expressed in the truth of pain:

  1. “This is the truth of pain: birth is painful, old age is painful, sickness is painful. Contact with unpleasant things is painful, not getting what one wishes is painful.
  2. “This is the truth of the cause of pain: that craving which leads to rebirth, combined with pleasure and lust, namely the craving for sensual pleasure, the craving for existence, the craving for nonexistence.
  3. “This is the truth of the cessation of pain: the cessation without a remainder of that craving, abandonment, forsaking, release, non-attainment.
  4. “This is the truth of the way that leads to the cessation of pain: it is the Noble Eightfold Path.”

This insight springs, not from observation of the particulars of existence, but from a vision of the whole. It imitates not a doubtful mood, but a serene insight—for in knowledge lies redemption. Placidly Buddha describes the state of presence in ever-new variations.

Buddha's vision of existence is expressed in the truth of pain (The Four Noble Truths)

Since the beginning of the twentieth century mindfulness has been positioned at the core of modern Buddhism and viewed by many contemporary interpreters as an essential component of Buddhist doctrine and practices. More recently, the practice of mindfulness has become speedily popularized, radically secularized and removed from its Buddhist context, employed mainly as a remedial tool or applied for the improvement of well-being.

The first half of the eighteenth century saw the discovery and circulation of sacred texts (in the three major languages of Buddhism—Pali, Sanskrit, and Tibetan) that ignited the European imagination and thereby inaugurated the linguistic undertaking to appreciate these languages. These discoveries themselves occurred in the background of economic colonial expansion (in contradistinction to earlier phases of interaction governed by theological colonialism) followed by European nations in every region of the world, but the push was particularly deepened across the vast Pacific and onto the Indian subcontinent.

This paper examines the thought of mindfulness using an historical lens, aiming to identify some of the main parameters and consequent implications involved in the changes and developments of this Buddhist contemplative method—from its early beginnings over 2,500 years ago to the present day. Distinct attention is given to the historical progresses in the colonial period, when various Buddhist traditions encountered the main European discourses of the time, resulting in the birth of modern Buddhism.

Transcend Ignorance by Knowledge

The Buddha taught that he heart of the matter is that men, like all living creatures, are blind, ignorant, misled by the things to which they cling, by what never is, but is forever caught up in absolute transience, in coming and going, in never-ending becoming.

A ‘bodhisattva’ is one who has attained the highest level of Buddhist accomplishment prior to nirvana. The bodhisattva is a teacher who foregoes final liberation in order to help the rest of us to accomplish liberation. This concept is part of the Mahayana or ‘greater vehicle’ tradition of Buddhism. The idea is contemplated less selfish than the ideal of the arhat, who pursues liberation individually.

The aim of Buddhist practice is to be rid of the delusion of ego and thus free oneself from the fetters of this commonplace world. One who is successful in doing so is said to have surmount the round of rebirths and to have achieved enlightenment. This is the final goal in most Buddhist traditions, though in some cases (particularly though not exclusively in some Pure Land schools in China and Japan) the attainment of an definitive paradise or a heavenly abode is not clearly distinguished from the attainment of release.

Thus there is only one means of liberation: to surpass ignorance by knowledge. But nothing can be changed by insight into particulars here and there. It is only the essential state of vision in which we see the whole that transforms and saves. Salvation lies in liberation from attachment to things, in release from all vain craving-these deliberate insight into the condition and origin of this whole existence and the means of withdrawing it. Ignorance itself, blindness, attachment to the finite, are the source of this existence; perfect knowledge is its annulment.

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How to Create a Great, Happy, Satisfied Workplace

How to Create a Great Workplace

How does any company, small or large, gain competitive advantage in a crowded and highly competitive marketplace? Instinct tells us to watch what our competitors do and try to the same things better. But, because competitors are also trying to get better, you won’t gain much from that approach. Though counterintuitive and less comfortable, a more productive approach is to be different. By taking that tack, your activities are less likely to end up as commodities, differentiated only by price.

Several companies have taken their basic assets and by rearranging them, have created unique business propositions and a distinctive presence. These companies have made specialization decisions that enabled them to align their assets and activities differently.

First, there is Southwest Airlines. Their strategy is to compete with the automobile as a means of intercity transportation. To that end, they serve short routes with frequent departures. To keep costs low, they limit themselves to one type of aircraft—the Boeing 737. Because they have the industry’s largest 737 fleet, they buy or lease on very attractive terms. Further, they serve no meals, offer no seat assignments, and do not transfer baggage to other airlines. They avoid airports with high landing fees or frequent delays. This enables them to make quicker turns and fly more legs each day, resulting in lower fares. Today they are profitable.

Second, Enterprise Rent-A-Car has shot from relative anonymity to become a leader among car rental companies. They achieved this not by copying Hertz and Avis, but by specializing in a different market. Instead of competing for airport rentals, they aimed at the insurance and car repair markets. They cultivated both by giving superior service and tailoring their activities to individuals who have lost the use of their cars for a period. No one else was doing that.

Edward Jones experience was shaped by just few factors. The first was the insights Ted Jones. Unlike his father, Edward D. Jones Sr., whose vision was to be a department store of finance, offering every product and service, Ted saw a vast underserved market of serious, long-term investors. Instead of offering everything in one market, he wanted to distribute a limited range of highly reliable long-term investments in many markets. His vision was different.

The second factor was the decision in the early 1970s to codify Edward Jones’s beliefs and strategy. Edward Jones had a successful business model with 120 representatives, but also had only $1,005,000 of capital in a business that was based on capital. Edward Jones had to specialize in areas that were not capital intensive.

The thinking of Peter Drucker guided Edward Jones. He teaches that every business must answer three questions:

  1. What is our business?
  2. Who is our customer?
  3. What does the customer consider value?

With so little capital, Edward Jones couldn’t compete for the highly profitable institutional or underwriting business. Knowing it was impossible to do it well, Edward Jones chose not to do it at all. Edward Jones were making trade-offs to align its resources to serve one customer one way. As Michael Porter points out, you define trade-offs not in terms of what you choose to do, but what you choose not to do. At that point, Edward Jones had begun to make ourselves different.

Edward Jones

How to Create a Great Workplace

Here are 10 trade-offs made by Edward Jones. None made was unique. None suggests moral superiority. However, each makes that company a little different and together, they make us so different that few competitors even want to emulate Edward Jones.

  1. Edward Jones’s initial decisions addressed the Drucker questions. Edward Jones were in the securities industry serving the serious, long-term “buy-and-keep” investor. The value Edward Jones sought to add was to help our customers achieve their financial goals through sound advice and a face-to-face personal relationship. In doing so, Edward Jones chose not to serve large institutions, or frequent traders because few, if any, traders are consistently successful over time. Edward Jones chose to forego these markets, one promising large commissions and the other, and frequent commissions. However, they were realistic decisions, knowing that others were not lining up to offer personal service to smaller investors.
  2. If Edward Jones were to serve one customer, Edward Jones felt they should focus on one profit center—the investment representative (IR) who directly serves the customer. They wanted to closely align their activities with their customers’ interest. That notion prohibited profit centers in their trading and syndicate departments. One profit center also meant no manager would get an override commission from the work of their investment representatives. Each of these decisions was at odds with industry practice.
  3. Edward Jones chose not to manufacture its own products. As distributors of a number of mutual funds, it would have been possible to start selling Edward Jones’s own funds. By offering house brands, they would capture the manufacturer’s profit. However, by concentrating on the products offered by preferred vendors, Edward Jones still had the best investment managers working for customers.
  4. Rather than try to lure licensed and trained IRs from competitors, Edward Jones chose to grow its own. Since Edward Jones couldn’t pay competitors’ brokers a bonus to come work for them, Edward Jones dedicated ourselves to on-going training to prepare IRs to serve one type of customer—the individual investor, one way—with sound long-term investments, and in one format—a community-based office. This was and is Edward Jones’s only business. For training Edward Jones were eager to invest capital. Today, using specialized materials and customized facilities, Edward Jones prepares 200 new IR candidates each month. Edward Jones also provides ongoing training to all 7,500 IRs and office administrators. All training is aligned to serve the needs of one customer. Training is the company’s main investment.
  5. Compliance with regulatory and industry standards is the foundation upon which all else rests. Again, alignment helps Edward Jones with their task. They see IRs as artists. Each is given a canvas and a palette of paints. The canvas is compliance. One may not stray beyond its boundaries. Here, the power of technology and the judgment of associates are applied exhaustively to oversee and monitor all activity. The IR’ s palette, meanwhile, contains the products and service Edward Jones want to offer and excludes those they don’t. Within those boundaries they create their masterpieces. The most important aspect of compliance, however, is the sense of responsibility built into the local nature of Edward Jones’s business and the face-to-face relationship. When an IR meets a customer at church, the club, at scout meetings, or in the grocery store, the customers are real people. In seeking alignment with the needs of the serious individual investor, Edward Jones closes off potentially profitable options. But, by specializing, Edward Jones increase its leverage, offering tailored services to the one market they choose to serve. Also, by avoiding compromises they sharpen our image, which is our brand.
  6. To reduce internal competition, Edward Jones ties all bonuses to the firm’s success. Every IR has a direct financial incentive to help, rather than compete with, fellow IRs. Since this model attracts high-achievers, if Edward Jones were to set up incentives that rewarded them for outperforming one another, the resulting conflicts would be destructive. So, Edward Jones never reward the top 10 percent or top 100. All incentives are inclusive. If you achieve, your reward never comes at the expense of a colleague.
  7. Since none of Edward Jones’s products or services is tangible, nearly every associate at our firm is a knowledge worker. Their screens could contain calculus or video games. The only thing that matters is results. Because knowledge work defines the worker’s identity, the reputation of the company and its work style are crucial. Both contribute to the worker’s self-image and self-worth. Since most knowledge workers live to work, not work to live, they aspire to provide a collegial workplace. Edward Jones retain a dress code. They expect civility. They also respect the contribution of each associate.
  8. Edward Jones loves technology. Technology enables Edward Jones to deliver excellent service to more than 7,000 locations in 50 states, Canada, and the UK. For some financial services firms, the Internet presented a dilemma—should they offer online trading? For Edward Jones the decision was easy. In society, about 15 percent of the population likes to do it themselves. Since our value added is the IR-customer relationship, Edward Jones chose not to establish channel that would compete directly with IRs. Instead, Edward Jones’s internet site supports the IR-customer relationship.
  9. Edward Jones have always had heroes. Peter Drucker teaches Edward Jones how to respect the dignity and contribution of each worker. Michael Porter affirms that it’s crucial to be different, to sustain competitive advantage. John Kotter teaches that a growing organization requires many leaders. Warren Buffett shows us the power of principles and discipline in investing. Southwest Airlines shows that enormous potential exists in markets that others reject. Wal-Mart proves that you can grow without compromising service or profit margins.
  10. Edward Jones chose to remain a partnership. It will only become a corporation if they have a compelling need to do so. Because Edward Jones started with so little capital, it created a model that minimizes the need for capital-intensive items, such as bricks and mortar, product manufacture, large inventories, or proprietary trading. Edward Jones limits spending. Thus, as a partnership, Edward Jones have funded our expansion internally.

You need to find way to set yourself apart, even if those differences seem minor. Align your activities so customers and prospects can recognize your unique business proposition. By striving to be better at what you already are the best at doing, unlimited growth is possible.

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Mantra for Spiritual Transformation

A Mani stone enscribed with the six-syllabled Buddhist mantra of Avalokiteshvara

Mantras are sounds, syllables, and words as the source of spiritual transformation.

One of the primary goals for those who practice Hinduism and Buddhism is to experience a transformation of consciousness through particular acts of the mind and body. A mantra is a vocalized or written repetition of syllables, words, or phrases that helps to focus the mind and body in order to achieve this transformation. In some mantras, the words themselves become an action that can bring about the transformation. The sound or words of a mantra are representative of an ultimate reality that is meaningful beyond the understanding of the person who is pronouncing them. By performing a mantra, a person is able to place their mind and will in line with the ultimate reality.

The most recognizable mantra is the sound or syllable “Om.” According to the the Upanishads part of the Hindu Vedas, written between c. 1500 and c. 500 BCE-the syllable “Om” represents all of creation. Meditating while uttering this syllable brings the subject closer to realizing the connectedness of all things in the universe. Mantras are also meaningful in the Buddhist tradition, in which they have been expanded beyond vocalized sounds to include written language and characters. As Buddhism spread to China, the writing of mantras became more important as a form of meditation. In either form, vocalized or written, repetition of mantras is a common form of meditating on their fundamental truth.

The idea of a mantra is important for understanding the way that a person’s mind can be intentionally and completely focused on a certain task. Mantras are particularly useful in religious practices that strive to push the self beyond its own consciousness. Outside of religious traditions, the term “mantra” has come to refer to any phrase that is commonly repeated, typically one that contains an essential truth or guiding principle.

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The Wonderful Benefits Intergenerational Coaching

The Wonderful Benefits Intergenerational Coaching

All generations have similar values. Many deliberate that there are such differences between generations but in reality, all feel that family is the value chosen most commonly by people of all generations. Others embrace truthfulness, love, aptitude, happiness, self-respect, knowledge, etc. So why do people at work think the ethics between generations are so different?

'Unlocking Generational Codes' by Anna Liotta (ISBN 1935586424) The public declaration of these hymns reveals how applause, pain, and politics interface within a historical setting of Roman oppression. Because even though the values are the same, the behaviors that go along with those values may be different. In addition to the standing of not snubbing the supposed stereotypes of employees, we should also not overlook undercurrents that occur in work groups. The diverse knowledge base that junior employees can present is a benefit that can be taken advantage of.

  • Give More Feedback: Animators at Disney generously pronounce how painful it can be to have directors plussing their ideas until the tiniest details, say a sliver of hair, seems just precise. We are probably unaware that people would like to know how to improve, and they merit to know it. It is their right. Besides the rewards of intergenerational learning for individuals, benefits of this learning process can also be found for corporations. Intergenerational learning leads to a higher level of social capital. This increased level of social capital has in turn the potential to enhance knowledge flows between workers in an organizational context. The negative feedback is often buried and not very specific.
  • Boost Flexibility: Literature provides a choice of concepts that are directly related to those of familiarity demand and supply. Employees working in the service sector, salaried employees, employees in executive positions, and employees with higher wages have better access to conventional flextime than other groups. The Cleveland Clinic hiring as many as two millennial doctors to replenish each retiree, as young MOs demand more work life balance. Business is concerned with productivity and profits. People are an progressively valuable resource, which management is becoming more affected to manage effectively. Attaining operative knowledge management integration is an eminent challenge facing both general management and project managers.
  • Lavish Praise for Intergenerational Workplace Lavish Praise: After considering the observations in light of extant research, we present a multi-stage process model that describes the central dynamics at work in the business experience. Over the following decade, the centers presented new communication and educational tools and maintained a wide variety of cultural events including exhibitions, forums, exchanges, and publications. The support provided to individuals and organizations proved instrumental and contributed to an added visibility of the region. The results of the analysis are deduced in the business context in order to show how communication research may impact to the analysis of intergenerational learning in a specific business. The company’s polished performances balance cheery explorations of humanity with serious concerns ranging from death, aging, and solitude to immigration, beauty, and fairy tales.
  • Adorn the Office: Apple plans to spend $1 billion to revamp a chief corporate campus with a focus on new technology and shared spaces. Foster abilities that cannot be automated away: timeless talents like critical thinking, playing nice and effective writing. Moreover, do not be afraid to skip around to understand relevant skills. This assertion also resonates with the experience of the Watsons of I.B.M. fame. In his 1990 autobiography, Tom Watson Jr. recollects how his early years were overwhelmed by a sense of inadequacy vis-à-vis his father’s expectations that he take over IBM. Obfuscating the mix further were what amounted to ‘staged’ career achievements, such as when young Tom was assigned a coveted sales territory in downtown Manhattan that allowed him to meet his sales quota in just one day.

'When Generations Collide' by Lynne Lancaster, David Stillman (ISBN 0066621070) While generational issues do need to be discussed and resolved, I am troubled about making too big an issue out of them. We do not want to draw a line between two generations of managers and involuntarily disaffect them from each other. Instead, we need to learn to work together as we seek to help librarianship advance with the times to serve the needs of the public. Each manager, new or experienced, old or young, brings respected experiences, perceptions, skills, and ideas to the profession. We need to find a way to concede those assets and put them to trustworthy use.

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Philosophical Hedonism

Philosophical Hedonism

Philosophical Hedonism holds that human actions should be motivated by the pursuit of pleasure.

How should we live? We pursue education so that we can get a career, so we can make money, so we can buy things, so we can … what? Presumably, we do not want a career or money just to have a career or money, but in order to be happy. The idea that the morally good or “right” motivation for acting is the pursuit of pleasure and avoidance of pain is called hedonism.

Hedonism can be traced to the sixth-century BCE Indian philosophy Carvaka, but its most influential form was in the ancient Greek teachings of Aristippus of Cyrene (c. 435–356 BCE) and Epicurus (341–270 BCE). Epicurus said in a letter to Meneoceus, “[We] do everything for the sake of being free of pain and mental distress.”

Regarding pleasure as the only valuable pursuit, hedonism sets itself apart from other widely accepted moral views, such as that a person has moral duties to do certain things regardless of whether they make them happy (deontology) and that a person has obligations to do whatever God commands, irrespective of the impact on their own welfare (divine command theory).

However, philosophical hedonism should be distinguished from the mere pursuit of pleasure. While some accuse hedonists of advocating a life of debauchery, philosophical hedonists reject this characterization. Epicurus argued that while every pleasure is good, “it does not follow that every pleasure is a choice worthy without qualification.” He extolled traditional virtues of self-sufficiency, prudence, and even a healthy diet, since they too contribute to a lifetime of happiness. Though hedonism was rejected by many influential moral philosophers (such as Thomas Aquinas and Immanuel Kant), it continues to play an influential role in contemporary moral and political thought.

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Plato Discusses Compulsory Education in “The Republic”

Compulsory education is a system of education that begins at birth and identifies society’s future leaders.

A second-century relief from a Roman burial monument, depicting a boy reading to his teacher. Schooling was provided for boys only during Roman times. The notion of compulsory education refers to a period of education mandated by law or by some comparable authority. One of the earliest efforts to codify requirements for education is set out in the Talmud, the compendium of Jewish law. The Talmud recommends a form of private education in the family home that emphasizes religious matters in addition to training in whatever the family vocation might be.

Plato (c. 424–c. 348 BCE) was one of the earliest thinkers to draw up the architecture of a full-blown system of public education. In The Republic (c. 360BCE), he describes an education system designed to effect the social stratification that, according to him, is prerequisite for justice to prevail in a state. Plato wrote, “I would teach children music, physics, and philosophy; but most importantly music, for the patterns in music and all the arts are the keys to learning.”

Plato, Philosopher and Mathematician in Classical Greece The education system of his republic begins at birth, when infants are removed from the family and raised by a collective. Educators are tasked with monitoring children in order to identify leadership qualities so that those who have “gold in their souls” (Plato uses this precious metal as a metaphor for leadership potential) can be properly trained to assume elevated offices of state, the highest of which is the office of philosopher king.

In Laws (c. 360 BCE), a later work, Plato presents a more moderate education system, one that more closely resembles contemporary systems. Infants are not removed from their families and there are no philosopher kings. However, proper social stratification is still the objective. Formal schooling begins at the age of six, when the curriculum focuses on literacy and arithmetic. By age thirteen, music is introduced into the curriculum, and at age eighteen the youth begins his terms of military service. By the age of twentyone, those students demonstrating the necessary aptitudes are selected for advanced studies that lead to the highest offices of the state. Education systems surprisingly close in character to this ancient model are now the norm in every developed country.

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Magnificent Architecture of Gol Gumbaz in Bijapur, Karnataka

Muhammad Adil Shah's architectural treasures in the city of Bijapur in northern Karnataka

Celebrated for its Muhammad Adil Shah’s architectural treasures, the city of Bijapur, in northern Karnataka has in recent years gained celebrity, both in the popular domain as a destination for travel and tourism, and in the intellectual domain as an object of academic study.

Even though art-historical studies of Bijapur have tended to focus attention upon the monuments and urban layout developed during the Muhammad Adil Shah’s period, the city was already evidenced by a cosmopolitan population and architectural activity before Muhammad Adil Shah transformed it during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to function as their capital. Gol Gumbaz and Ibrahim Roza in Bijapur continue to draw hundreds of visitors every day.

There have been no reductions in the number of Indian tourists visiting the two sites, there has been a decrease of between 50 and 100 in the number of arrivals from abroad compared to last year. In order to attract more tourists, the Archaeological Survey of India has taken steps to upgrade Bara Kaman, Gagan Mahal, Chota Gumbaz and the Citadel Wall.

Magnificent Architecture of Gol Gumbaz in Bijapur, Karnataka

Gol Gumbaz, literally meaning round dome is a tomb of Muhammad Adil Shah (1627-57 CE) planned by himself even before his death. Thus, this monument is one of the largest and most outstanding single buildings in the entire country. This mausoleum is one of the finest structural triumphs of the Indian builders because of its astonishing size. It is a square building with each side measuring 205 ft and its height is 200 feet. The building consists of four thick walls topped by a dome, the outside diameter of which is 144 ft. The interior of the hall measures 135 ft across and it is 178 ft high. Thus, it has over eighteen thousand square feet. It is said that this is bigger than the Parthenon of Greece, which is one of the enormous and magnificent structures. Thus by the sheer size of various parts, Gol Gumbaz reigns supreme in the world of architecture.

Architecture is the construct of life and tradition and has to be understood as such. All plastic art forms are symbiotic on each other for their fullest expression, with the performing and literary arts playing supplementary and complementary roles in the overall composition. India, home of an ancient culture, has long been noted for its civilizational forays, which encompassed varied scientific ideas and technical skills. Its geographical position in the ancient world enabled it to become an internationally important center for integrating and transmitting new scientific ideas and techniques.

engineering wonder and Geometric precision of Gol Gumbaz in Bijapur, Karnataka

However, this is not all. Gol Gumbaz is considered an engineering wonder by the skillful composition of its various parts, the harmonious combination of arches, cornices, foliated parapet and ultimately in the interior to support the vast dome. It is so ingeniously planned to convert the square hall into a circular one by making it into eight angles over which the entire load of the dome rests. This dome is the biggest in Asia and the second biggest in the world. The dome itself is a plain plastered vault with six small openings and is 10 ft in thickness. The interior surface of the dome is placed twelve feet from the inner edge of the circle to distribute and transmit its huge weight downwards on to the four walls. The conversion of a square hall while going up into an octagon and then into a circle finally is a great engineering accomplishment. One can climb to the top through the six-sided enclosed staircases with small domes on all the four sides, which add a grace to the structure. Geometric precision was achieved for the various elements of the dome, including the cast joints, the curved tubular sections and the fixings, through meticulous workmanship.

The domed, centrally-planned design adopted to mark the site of Jesus’ death and resurrection was adopted as well for Christian martyria and baptisteries. However, both the architectural form and the symbolical associations of these Christian buildings were themselves obligated to earlier, non-Christian traditions. With regard to construction, both Christians and Muslims shared a common legacy of building materials, techniques, and tools passed on from the Greco-Roman, Persian, and even the earlier Etruscan worlds. The geometric references of both Christian and Islamic sacred buildings were not merely rooted in mystical thought with no scientific basis. Rather, such mystical thought was familiarly bound with pre-modern cosmology.

Corbelled dome is the Gol Gumbaz at Bijapur and Whispering Gallery

The most awe-inspiring example of a corbelled dome is the Gol Gumbaz at Bijapur. It is generally overlooked that the third largest dome in the world is built upon the megalithic principle. The distinct bricks set in the horizontal courses are embedded in so much of mortar that the dome becomes a mass of mortar to which the bricks have been added. It is believed in some quarters, for structural reasons, that the masonry of the Gol Gumbaz does serve only to transmit vertical stresses to the masonry. However, in all probability for the architect here, the traditional experience of mortar in dome was to safeguard stability for such a massive and unique structural heroic of this kind. If the cast dome of the Gol Gumbaz deserves to be called a corbelled because of its horizontally set bricks, most of the vaulting at Bijapur is pure cast forms that are not liable to collapse even when most of the underpinning has been destroyed. Many unique shapes of ceilings were possible because of the pioneering use of mortar, which is very stable.

Another greatness about this tomb is that it is a whispering gallery where even the mild sound is multiplied hundred fold and reverberates. That is the reason why this is famous all over the world as a whispering gallery. Within the center of the building and below the ground level is the real tomb of its creator Muhammad Adil Shah and his relatives. Nevertheless, what are seen on the ground now are the imitation tombs. Thus, Muhammad Adil Shah gave to the world a great and marvelous structure exhibiting the engineering skill of medieval India, which has won admiration even from modem engineers.

The rich culture, heritage, and architecture of the north Karnataka region are something to be cherished. The region is not only known for its rich cultural heritage but also for great talents in arts and literature.

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Read to Find Investment Ideas

Read to find investment ideas The secret of finding investment ideas can be summarized in one word: READ.

Of course, in order to spend a lot of time on business news, you must be interested in economic and financial affairs. But as you become more accustomed to accumulating and storing financial information, you will find the subject increasingly interesting, particularly if your interpretation of events leads to profits.

Nothing can motivate you more than your own success. The turbulence in the financial markets underscores the importance of becoming your own analyst. This will insulate you from other people’s opinions and will give you the confidence to pursue your own ideas and goals by checking out the facts.

The way to do this is with a disciplined system of reading and information gathering. Over time, you should acquire a financial file or library of companies, ideas and trends that warrant investment attention. To sniff out opportunities from the financial news requires an understanding of what to look for.

Two people might read the same article, one of whom may spot a nuance that suggests an important opportunity, while the other person sees nothing of significance.

What we aim to provide in this chapter are some hints and clues on what to look for in the financial news, what to read and how to accomplish all this in the least amount of time.

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Objectivism: Ayn Rand’s Novel Philosophy

The Religion and Philosophy of Ayn Rand

Frustrated with her intellectual climate, novelist and lay philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-82) collected ideas from a variety of philosophers and cobbled them into a unique view that she named Objectivism. She expounded on this personal worldview in her novel Atlas Shrugged, published in 1957. Rand defends Aristotle’s ideas that reality exists objectively and authoritatively, that the laws of logic guide our understanding, and that consciousness is the seat of humans’ ability to know. She defends the rationalist ideas that morality is objective and that conscious rationality bestows special moral significance. And she also defends the classical liberal idea that each person is obligated to respect every person’s right to pursue her interests, so long as those pursuits do not interfere with another person’s right to do so. Rand then argues that the only sociopolitical system consistent with these ideas is laissez-faire capitalism, that is, a free market economy.

One controversial implication is what Rand calls “the virtue of selfishness.” Since each person is intrinsically valuable, one’s primary moral obligation is to pursue one’s own interests. This pursuit is limited only by the recognition that others are also valuable, and thus no one has the right to deceive or coerce others. Selfish interests cannot conflict because it cannot be in our interests to have something to which we have no right. Although some goods may result from collective action, such goods never justify the use of force.

Rand’s philosophy continues to spark controversy, especially among those who argue that some “social goods” cannot be achieved by individuals and that unacceptable economic inequalities result from unregulated trade. Though not all capitalists would call themselves Objectivists, many cite Rand as a formative influence, including economist Walter Williams (b. 1936) and politician Ron Paul (b. 1935).

Ayn Rand’s magnum opus, Atlas Shrugged (1957), encompassed her ideas of rationalism, individualism, and capitalism within a dystopian United States.

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Posted in Philosophy and Wisdom

Remembering Silicon Valley ‘Coach’ Bill Campbell

Remembering Silicon Valley 'Coach' Bill Campbell Bill Campbell, better known merely as “Coach,” was a renowned mentor of Silicon Valley executives and venture capitalists. He advised and coached some of tech’s biggest names, comprising Google’s Eric Schmidt, Apple’s Steve Jobs, and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos.

The cluster is a geographically proximate group of interrelated companies and associated institutions in a particular field, linked by cohesions and complementarities. The cluster model converges upon the circumstances that support firm competitiveness at the national scale. It is an economic development model that stimulates collaboration among institutions to accelerate the exchange of information and technology. A venture capital firm in structuring a fund aims to limit the obligation of investors to the amount of their investment and circumvent a double charge of taxation (once when returns on investments are realized by the fund and a second time when the investors receive the proceeds of their investment from the fund). The most important customers for these new technologies may be beyond US borders, however, where breaks for a solid education are hard to come by and a Western credential carries a lot of weight. Changes and adaptations have become customs and are embedded in the social norms of the Valley. But it so far cannot escape from its contract manufacturing past. It does not have the profundity of competences and capabilities, nor does it have the scale to take advantage of a more networked-oriented internet-driven economy. Entrepreneurial financing is an important mechanism to engender economic advantages. In particular, the science and technology incubators play a vital role in supporting entrepreneurship and economic growth. To date, few studies have looked meticulously at the strategies and policies that are crucial for creating an empowering environment for high-tech start-ups.

Bill Campbell did not describe himself as a workaholic, although as president of Claris he did acknowledge to working 16-hour days, having nightly business dinners, touring frequently and working weekends. After four years as head of Apple Computer’s sales and marketing effort, Campbell was connected more with hardware than software. Apple and Google shared personal ties, with Apple board members Bill Campbell and Al Gore, the former U.S. vice president, serving as advisers to Google in its formative days.

John Doerr, chair of venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins, called him “our SuperCoach — colorful confidante and mentor for leaders and whole teams.” Doerr brought Campbell to Google to serve as an informal adviser to founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. Campbell was influential in the hiring of Eric Schmidt to be Google’s chief executive in August 2001. Google’s executive chairman Eric Schmidt recalled in Forbes magazine that Campbell’s supreme gift was knowing how to goad and inspire people.

It’s hard to know what Google would have been like without him. He was present at every decision of consequence. He understood the people. He would normally say very little during my staff meetings and just observe. And then I and other executives would individually make a trek to his Intuit office in Palo Alto for his feedback. He wasn’t a technical wizard, but he understood how to solve human problems and motivate people. He would have been a good coach in any industry.

Bill Campbell viewed himself as Silicon Valley’s confidant. He was very careful to say, “I’m here to help you. I don’t want anything in return. I don’t want any attention.” If he had had a public persona, it would’ve made him less effective. This was very genuine. Some people want power or fame. He wanted love. He wanted to be appreciated. And he was.

The Silicon Valley culture efficaciously captures the prevailing ideological elements of Silicon Valley, mingling celebration of technology with a attraction with what the museum’s brochures refers to as the gizmos and gadgets produced by Valley companies. An obsession with speed: work late, work long, work fast, work smart, borrow and assimilate technical knowledge at the vanguard that is not already possessed, and enter the market place with an sophisticated solution needed by many with astounding features at a low cost point. A sale is incongruous to harvest a high price if the firm is seen as running out of funds and despairing for a savior. For a firm that cannot draw outside financing, an inside round can afford convenient “backstop financing.”

A Silicon Valley Confidant

Campbell was intensely involved in Silicon Valley’s start-up culture as well. Fortune’s Jennifer Reingold wrote that Campbell was careful not to take credit for his work, even while industry leaders spoke of Campbell “as if he’s some kind of profane cosmic mash-up of Oprah, Yoda and Joe Paterno.” Teams thrive to create synergy to respond to pressures of condensed product-planning life cycles, product competitiveness, and Silicon Valley’s parent companies’ influences. Global competition in the high technology industry is also at work here, where-as Campbell mentioned above–speed, quality, cost, and innovation propel strategy and structure.

Campbell coached the Columbia University football team in the 1970s (albeit with a losing record.) He then served as CEO of Intuit in the mid-1990s, then chairman from 1998 until January-2016, when he became chairman emeritus. Campbell was also chairman of the board of trustees at Columbia University from 2005 until 2014. Previously in his career, he had worked at Kodak and Apple, where he worked as a marketing executive. He was an Apple director from 1997 until 2014. His association with Apple dates back to 1983, when he enrolled the company as vice president of marketing. In 1983, Campbell took a chance by taking a job at Apple under John Sculley and Steve Jobs. Campbell left a position at Kodak, which was a $14 billion company at the time, for Apple, which was around $90 million then. Apple’s CEO Tim Cook said, “when Bill joined Apple’s board, the company was on the brink of collapse. He not only helped Apple survive, but he’s led us to a level of success that was simply unimaginable back in 1997.”

The anonymities of the trade become no secrecies; but are as it were in the air, and children learn many of them instinctively. In Silicon Valley, good work is rightly cherished; inventions and improvements in machinery, in processes and the general organization of the business have their qualities promptly discussed: if one man starts a new idea, it is taken up by others and combined with suggestions of their own; and thus it becomes the source of further new ideas. According to Campbell, the Silicon Valley’s determination for reliability was the catalyst behind the development of the planar process, and then of the integrated circuit. He confounded things by noting that the high tech industry’s drive to clutch its producers’ profits served to direct both Silicon Valley semiconductor and tube companies to look for saleable markets.

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