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25 Tips for Office Etiquette

Professional Office Etiquette

  1. Do not approach a colleague from behind him or from the side, where he cannot see you entering.
  2. When you call on somebody impromptu, ask if now is a good time to talk.
  3. Seek an appointment: ask what would be a convenient time for you to call on a colleague.
  4. Do not leave a voicemail when you know the recipient is out of office. Do not call your colleague in the first place.
  5. Less is more … well unless you are still doing all the wrong things.
  6. Show respect and courtesy.
  7. Time heals all wounds … regardless of how you feel right now.
  8. 'The Etiquette Edge: The Unspoken Rules for Business Success' by Beverly Langford (ISBN 0814472427) Keep personal telephone conversations, and emails, brief and at a minimum.
  9. Keep your personal and shared workspaces clean and neat at all times.
  10. Do not email during the weekends.
  11. Do not respond to emails during the weekends.
  12. Do not carbon-copy unnecessary people in your email.
  13. Check your spelling and your grammar before sending an email.
  14. Do not wear headphones or earphones in the elevator or hallway.
  15. 'Power Etiquette: What You Don't Know Can Kill Your Career' by Dana May Casperson (ISBN 0814479987) Do not play with your phone, check email, or text in the lobby or elevator.
  16. Do not touch your colleagues’ food in the office fridge.
  17. Taking ownership of failure builds the foundation for success.
  18. Adhere to the company dress codes.
  19. Monitor the volume of your conversations.
  20. It is okay to say no.
  21. The boss and the customer are always right.
  22. Manage your own emotions.
  23. Think of the needs and the opportunities of your organization before you think of your own needs and opportunities.
  24. It is OK to fail. If what you have tried is working, throw more fuel on the fire. If not, pull back.
  25. Have a small set of well-thought goals. Having enormous goals can actually undermine confidence.

Recommended Reading on Professional Office Etiquette

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Posted in Education and Career Management and Leadership

Gifts are Crucial Marketing Tools

Gifts are crucial marketing tools. They can help your customers remember you throughout the year.

'101 Marketing Essentials Every Camp Needs to Know' by Jodi Rudick (ISBN 1585180394) Marketing consultant Jodi Rudick suggests five occasions when business gifts can help solidify relationships with your customers and build your business. Jodi Rudick is the author of 101 Marketing Essentials Every Camp Needs to Know.

  • After the sale: Saying thank-you does more than complete the sale. It helps build the relationship.
  • After receiving referrals: The biggest compliment a sales person can receive is a referral. Send a thank-you immediately after receiving a referral.
  • Anniversaries: Celebrate the day you signed your first contract with a customer, making it a special date to salute each year.
  • Birthdays: Send your customers some birthday cheer, but not just a card. Be creative — send an entire party kit, complete with customized cakes, candles, hat, etc. All the excitement can make them feel special.
  • Holidays: Thinking beyond the traditional can make you stand out. Send a card or a gift on Halloween. Send a decorative jar of candles for Valentine’s Day, then each month send a refill along with product information, or an article that would interest the customer.
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Posted in Business and Strategy Life Hacks and Productivity

Dutch House Rules: Etiquette for Shared Offices and Homes

Dutch House Rules: Etiquette for Shared Offices and Homes

Many people simply do not know how to behave in an office environment, in dormitories, or, broadly speaking, in any shared space. The “Dutch House Rules” is an informal set of rules for propriety in shared spaces.

  • If you open it, close it.
  • If you turn it on, turn it off.
  • If you borrow it, return it.
  • If you don’t know how to use it, leave it alone.
  • If you break it, fix it.
  • If you can’t fix it, report it.
  • If you make a mess, clean it up.
  • If you move it, put it back.
  • If it doesn’t concern you, keep it that way.
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Posted in Philosophy and Wisdom

Habits That Drive Your Colleagues Crazy

Professional Office Etiquette

Corporate life survives more on what is not said than on what is clearly stated. Many of the rules of behavior that govern corporate life remain unspoken. To succeed, you will need to learn appropriate and polite ways to relate to others in the business world.

'The Etiquette Edge: The Unspoken Rules for Business Success' by Beverly Langford (ISBN 0814472427) The common observable mistakes that drive colleagues mad are outrageous habits such lack of discretion, replying-to-all on emails and pursuing personal affairs on company’s times. Common too are uncooperative and obstructive behaviors such as abusing the perks, stationary, and other benefits provided in good-faith, or discourteous use of communal resources such as the microwave and coffee machines.

Here are some less obvious behaviors that can drive your colleagues crazy:

  • Do you have the habit of trying to chat up your colleague the minute she walks into the office in the morning? Offer her a 15-minute courtesy zone.
  • 'Power Etiquette: What You Don't Know Can Kill Your Career' by Dana May Casperson (ISBN 0814479987) Do you have the habit of walking into a colleague’s office, seat yourself, and insist on a conversation? First, determine if the colleague is free and offer to come back at the opportune time
  • Do you have the habit of going over someone’s head? Do not carbon copy a colleague’s boss when you remind your colleague to respond to a previous request. Your “subtle” way of prodding him constitutes an irksome behavior.

Courtesy, politeness, and service are necessary to build successful professional and personal relationships in the workplace. Social skills and thoughtful consideration are necessary to transact business with suppliers, customers, peers, and management.

Recommended Reading on Professional Office Etiquette

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Posted in Education and Career