The Real Significance of Rust

Replacing the Old with the New

Replacing the Old with the New If the inclination of religious knowledge were good, wisdom must direct, and duty obliges us to school it. In addition, what has already been verbally expressed about the world of the psyche holds good here to a still higher degree; that is, that one has to employ analogies in order to distinguish it. There was an excruciating drive back to Maryland, where we said what we claimed, maybe even believed, and were impermanent goodbyes.

Creation goes on day by day. The momentous words, “Let there be light” by which God launched the universe, started the process, but it is unfinished. As we master the laws of nature, as we understand the hidden forces at work in our own lives, and with that knowledge fashion a nobler world, we are continuing the work of creation. Among the many aids, that God has provided for our work is rust.

Continuous creation involves replacing the old with the new. That which has played its part in the drama of existence must give way, so that the fresh may make its appearance. Rust, like every other form of decay, removes the obsolete from the scene to make room for the new, and without it, the world would long have become clogged up with accumulations of junk. The debris of death would have crowded out life. Rust is the sanitation department in God’s universe.

Rust has a parallel in human phenomena. Forgetfulness is a kind of rust working on experience. Because we forget the old, we can more readily embrace the new. One shudders to think what would happen if we could not forget if our minds were forced to carry all our memories in active consciousness.

The human phenomenon, which offers the closest parallel to rust, is death. One generation dies that a new generation may take its place. A mature person cannot therefore rebel against death. It is the price we must always pay for the emergence of new life. Death and life are only the opposite sides of the same coin. We cannot have one without the other.

Goodness and Mercy and Compassion and Sympathy

Goodness and Mercy and Compassion and Sympathy You are goodness and mercy and compassion and sympathy. You are peace and joy and light. You are pardon and forbearance, strength and courageousness, a helper in time of need, a reliever in time of sorrow, a therapist in time of injury, a teacher in times of mental confusion. You are the deep wisdom and the highest truth; the superlative peace and the grandest love. You are these things. In addition, in moments of your life you have known yourself to be these things. Select now to know yourself as these things always. Russell Means, the prominent activist for the rights of Native American people, wrote in For America to Live, Europe Must Die,

Soldiers who have seen a lot of combat learn to … [dehumanize] the enemy before going back into combat. Murderers do it before going out to commit murder. Nazi SS guards did it to concentration camp inmates. Cops do it. Corporation leaders do it to the workers they send into uranium mines and steel mills. Politicians do it to everyone in sight. And what the process has in common for each group doing the dehumanizing is that it makes it all right to kill and otherwise destroy other people. One of the Christian commandments says, ‘Thou shalt not kill,’ at least not humans, so the trick is to mentally convert the victims into nonhumans.

Elucidate your goals. You may not even be aware of some of them, so unfeasible might they seem because of the distressing feelings that even contemplating them stirs up. The directors use the word prepare, because that comes up best to the innovation of the society, which is, to apprise the children, first of all, in the knowledge of Christian religion, the reformed Protestant Church faith.

Happiness research is clear: buy experiences, not things. The apotheosis held steadily in mind attracts the requisite precondition for its fulfillment. If temporal happiness is not the goal of dharma, then what is it that prompts a person to want to apply? Chances are that stepping onto a religious path would not even occur to a person who is rich, enjoys their life, and has a strong sense of personal security. In a sure sense, such moments go beyond, or lie hidden under, the gratification or frustration of our desires.

Tagged
Posted in Philosophy and Wisdom

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*