Blog Archives

19 Inspiring Quotes by Yogacharya B.K.S. Iyengar

19 Inspiring Quotes by Yogacharya B.K.S. Iyengar

Yoga, an ancient discipline, has become popular worldwide. The selling of yoga and debate over its origins have led to discuss as to whether yoga should be branded at all. Some yoga instructors have gone so far as to patent their variations of yoga; others in the yoga community declare it is a religious and/or spiritual practice and as such should not be declared as intellectual property.

Yogacharya (Yoga Expert Guru) B.K.S. Iyengar was born in India to a family of thirteen children, ten of whom lived. His brother-in-law Tirumalai Krishnamacharya, introduced Iyengar to yoga through the yoga school he ran. Iyengar was not successful in the beginning, and it was only in 1952 when Iyengar met Yehudi Menuhin that he became internationally known.

Menuhin was suffering from sleeplessness and Iyengar showed him an asana which caused him to fall asleep, and wake up so rested that he spent several hours with the yoga teacher and later came to believe that yoga assisted his violin-playing. Iyengar paid frequent visits to the west where his system of yoga was adopted by schools and centers. Iyengar yoga is known for its use of such props as straps, chairs, or blocks in empowering students to accomplish the traditional asanas, or body postures. One of Iyengar’s earliest books, Light on Yoga (1966), is a clarification for Westerners of Patanjali’s thought.

Iyengar is specifically linked with the idea of yoga as a spiritual activity, and a discipline that he explained as “the quest of the soul for the spark of divinity within us.” In every movement, students should be psychologically aware, as yoga is more than a system of aerobic or flexibility exercises.

Iyengar yoga teachers are among the most meticulously trained in the field of yoga. A teacher must finish two full years of training and supervision to be certified at the introductory level. The New York Iyengar organization requires teacher candidates to be experienced in practicing Iyengar yoga up to Level III and to uphold a home practice.

  • 'Light on Yoga: The Classic Guide to Yoga' by B. K. S. Iyengar (ISBN 8172235011) “The union of nature and soul removes the veil of ignorance that covers our intelligence.”
  • “Yoga allows you to find an inner peace that is not ruffled and riled by the endless stresses and struggles of life.”
  • “Yoga is a means and an end.”
  • “When you see a mistake in somebody else, try to find if you are making the same mistake.”
  • “By drawing our senses of perception inward, we are able to experience the control, silence, and quietness of the mind.”
  • “Yoga does not just change the way we see things, it transforms the person who sees.”
  • “My body is my temple and asanas are my prayers.”
  • “Know your capacities and continually improve upon them.”
  • “It is through your body that you realize you are a spark of divinity.”
  • “Your body exists in the past and your mind exists in the future. In yoga, they come together in the present.”
  • “As animals, we walk the earth. As bearers of divine essence, we are among the stars. As human beings, we are caught in the middle.”
  • “Yoga teaches us to cure what need not be endured and endure what cannot be cured.”
  • 'B.K.S. Iyengar Yoga: The Path to Holistic Health' by B. K. S. Iyengar (ISBN 1465415831) “Words cannot convey the value of yoga—it has to be experienced.”
  • “The supreme adventure in a man’s life is his journey back to his Creator.”
  • “Change is not something that we should fear. Rather, it is something that we should welcome. For without change, nothing in this world would ever grow or blossom, and no one in this world would ever move forward to become the person they’re meant to be.”
  • “The art of teaching is tolerance. Humbleness is the art of learning.”
  • “Be inspired but not proud.”
  • “Change leads to disappointment if it is not sustained. Transformation is sustained change, and it is achieved through practice.”
  • “It is while practicing yoga asanas that you learn the art of adjustment.”
  • “Body is the bow, asana is the arrow, and the soul is the target.”
  • “When you inhale, you are taking the strength from God. When you exhale, it represents the service you are giving to the world. When you exhale, it represents the service you are giving to the world. When you inhale, you are taking the strength from God.”
  • “Life means to be living. Problems will always be there. When they arise navigate through them with yoga—don’t take a break.”
  • “True concentration is an unbroken thread of awareness.”
  • “Action is movement with intelligence. The world is filled with movement. What the world needs is more conscious movement, more action.”
  • “Yoga allows you to find a new kind of freedom that you may not have known even existed.”
  • 'Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali' by B. K. S. Iyengar (ISBN 0007145160) “When I practice, I am a philosopher. When I teach, I am a scientist. When I demonstrate, I am an artist.”
  • “Focus on keeping your spine straight. It is the job of the spine to keep the brain alert.”
  • “How can you know God if you don’t know your big toe?”
  • “Do not stop trying just because perfection eludes you.”
  • “Breath is the king of mind.”
  • “Spirituality is not some external goal that one must seek, but a part of the divine core of each of us, which we must reveal.”
  • “Your body is the child of the soul. You must nourish and train that child.”
  • “There is no difference in souls, only the ideas about ourselves that we wear.”
  • “It is through the alignment of the body that I discovered the alignment of my mind, self, and intelligence.”
  • “Illuminated emancipation, freedom, unalloyed and untainted bliss await you, but you have to choose to embark on the Inward Journey to discover it.”
  • “The hardness of a diamond is part of its usefulness, but its true value is in the light that shines through it.”
  • “Yoga is a light, which once lit, will never dim. The better your practice, the brighter the flame.”
  • 'Iyengar Yoga: Classic Yoga Postures For Mind, Body And Spirit' by Judy Smith (ISBN 0754830764) “One’s spiritual realization lies in none other than how one walks among and interacts with one’s fellow beings.”
  • “Health is a state of complete harmony of the body, mind and spirit. When one is free from physical disabilities and mental distractions, the gates of the soul open.”
  • “Willpower is nothing but willingness to do.”
  • “Yoga is like music. The rhythm of the body, the melody of the mind, and the harmony of the soul creates the symphony of life.”
  • “You exist without the feeling of existence.”
  • “Confidence, clarity and compassion are essential qualities of a teacher.”
  • “You must purge yourself before finding faults in others.”
  • “Do not aim low, you will miss the mark. Aim high and you will be on a threshold of bliss.”
  • “You do not need to seek freedom in a different land, for it exists with your own body, heart, mind, and soul.”
  • “Yoga allows you to rediscover a sense of wholeness in your life, where you do not feel like you are constantly trying to fit broken pieces together.”
  • “Yoga is the golden key that unlocks the door to peace, tranquility and joy.”
Tagged
Posted in Faith and Religion Health and Fitness

Chakras: Energy-collection Centers of the Body

A Buddhist Thangka painting from Nepal, showing the seven main chakras of the body

Chakras are energy-collection centers of the body that are essential for physical and mental health.

In the traditions of Buddhism and Hinduism, chakras are centers of energy that correspond to parts of the body. A non-physical life force is said to travel through the body, and each chakra is linked to a part of this force. Chakras exist in the body along a central channel and are connected to vital bodily functions, including consciousness, vision, communication, health, digestion, reproduction, and survival.

In the most common understanding of the system, each chakra is associated with a deity, color, bodily organ or set of organs, and a mantra (a transformative sound or syllable). Bringing the energy of the body in line with the central channel and the chakras is possible through meditation, and this process of alignment plays an important role in achieving fulfillment and enlightenment. Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi, founder of Sahaja Yoga, said “Kundalini [a corporeal energy] will rise and always cleanse the chakras.”

The idea of chakras is an ancient one and it is found in Sanskrit documents and in oral traditions of both Buddhism and Hinduism. “Breath channels,” for example, appear in the Hindu Vedas, produced in India between c. 1500 and c. 500 BCE. The idea of a hierarchy of the chakras was introduced later, in eighth-century Buddhist teachings. There is no standard interpretation of chakras in either religious tradition, with chakra systems varying from teacher to teacher within the same religious tradition.

Chakras are essential if we are to understand the body as a system of energy. Two of the five major world religions are built on the idea that human beings are capable of making peace within themselves as a result of energy systems within the body. The chakras are key to unlocking this inner power.

The theory of chakras plays a crucial role in two age-old Indian remedial systems (Ayurveda medicine and yoga) that are well-liked today. In recent decades, though, many contemporary actions (like polarity therapy, therapeutic touch, process acupressure, core energetics, and color therapy) have likewise integrated the concept of chakras into their own prophecies of restorative healing. Diverse approaches may be used to “balance” the chakras.

Tagged
Posted in Faith and Religion Health and Fitness

Try Salabhasana (Locust Pose) To Stand Up Straighter

The culture of India has produced a great assortment of systems of spiritual beliefs and practices. Primordial seers used yoga as a method to discover the exterior and interior world and, perhaps, eventually to attain wisdom and knowledge of the sacred Indian texts: the Vedas, Upanishads, and Shastras. These great teachers, or gurus, did not equate yoga with religion but more as an art of living at the highest level in attunement with the larger life—realism. The weight in yoga was on personal verification rather than on belief. The practice of yoga was a way to inner joyfulness and outer harmony.

If you spend hours a day hunched over a computer, you may end up with a rounded upper back—a condition associated with weak and painfully tight muscles in the neck, shoulders, and spine area.

The routine of yoga in the Indian subcontinent has been documented as early as 3000 BCE. The word yoga comes from the equivalent Sanskrit origin as the word for yoke; it suggests exploiting oneself to a discipline or a way of life. This procedure has a widespread appeal in that it is not connected with religious faith, and it is deliberated a procedure of personal development. There are several types of yoga; two are Hatha and Raja yoga, the most frequently performed in the West. Yoga involves educating the mind and body through exercises and meditation.

Sage Patanjali‘s earliest description of yoga-sutra is in Sanskrit language in poetic structure. Initially taught in the oral tradition, yoga-sutra afterward was transliterated in various languages. The original translation affirms that yoga is proof in itself of its benefits and has been practiced for several hundred years. It since has stood the test of time. Salabhasana or locust pose:

Try Salabhasana (Locust Pose) To Stand Up Straighter

  1. Lie prone with arms by the side, palms facing up. Inhale and lift the head, chest, and legs off the floor simultaneously.
  2. Most of the weight should be on the stomach and not on the arms, which continue to lie on the floor.
  3. Maintain this position for a few seconds, exhale, and return to prone position.

Mind-body interventions identical to yoga are encouraging approaches for healing cancer-related fatigue. Yoga involves physical postures (asanas) that advance strength and flexibility and promote relaxation. Yoga is also a contemplative practice, because the practitioner focuses on the body and breath in each pose. A growing body of research indicates that yoga has advantageous effects on physical and social outcomes in cancer patients and survivors, embracing enhancements in quality of life, mood, and fatigue. Nevertheless, as with the behavioral interventions, none of the published yoga trials has targeted patients with fatigue. Moreover, very few of these trials have included an active control group to maneuver for attention, group support, and other broad-based components of the treatment.

There are an assortment of books and pamphlets about yoga that have included precise recommendations for the cure of soreness and even certain kinds of stiffness. Proponents of these regimens quote ancient traditions passed on from teachers to students. Ostensibly, trial and error have been included to some degree. The valuable effects of yoga on arthritis are attributed to stretching, extending, and relaxing to bring calmness of the mind. Gurus are quoted as saying that they identify root causes of disease and treat these and not only symptoms and signs.

Yoga: postures advance physical strength & flexibility and promote relaxation

Try the Locust pose, or salabhasana, a basic yoga position.

It can combat aches and poor posture by stretching and strengthening those muscles.

  1. Lie on stomach, forehead on floor, arms reaching behind your back.
  2. Keep your legs close to each other.
  3. On an inhale, lift your head, chest and legs off floor; think of broadening your chest through your collarbones.
  4. Stay lifted for 3 to 5 breaths, resting on lower ribs, stomach, and front pelvis.
  5. Gaze forward, making sure you don’t scrunch your neck. Lower and repeat 3 to 5 times.

Individually yoga and physical exercise have been distinctly found to change the physical fitness, cognitive performance, and emotional wellbeing in individuals. Yoga and physical exercise diverge in three main ways, since yoga practice places a prominence on (i) breath mindfulness, (ii) controlled breathing, and (iii) mindful relaxation. Hence randomized precise examination aimed to compare the effects of yoga with those of physical exercise on physical fitness, cognitive functions and self-esteem.

Controlling for pre-intervention health differences, children in the yoga group had healthier post-intervention undesirable behavior scores and steadiness than the non-yoga group. The bulk of children in the yoga group testified improved wellbeing. The results recommend a possible role of yoga as a precautionary technique as well as a means of cultivating children’s identified wellbeing.

Tagged
Posted in Health and Fitness