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Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

On Jun 23, 2016, the UK voted to leave the EU. The economic and political consequences will be significant and long lasting, and not just for the UK and the EU. The repercussions will be felt everywhere. The key concern for EasyJet and Ryanair, among a number of airlines hypothetically affected, is what will happen if the UK fails to remain part of Europe’s single market in air services when Brexit negotiations accomplish.

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

A challenge for Ryanair is that its biggest base is in the UK, at London Stansted. Its two busiest UK routes in June this year are Dublin–Stansted and Dublin–London Gatwick.

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

CEO Michael O’Leary was upfront, opinionated and amusing as ever today at a Bloomberg News conference where he warned that Brexit could lead to contagion. The CEO of one of Europe’s largest airlines said that he would leave that to greater minds than his—referring to his treasury administrators. He warned that the budget airline would be forced to rationalize investment if Britain votes to leave the EU.

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

Appearing on a platform with British chancellor George Osborne at Stansted Airport, Mr O’Leary spoke that inward investment will be lost to participant EU member states such as Ireland and Germany if Britain votes for Brexit. O’Leary said,

It is this type of large-scale foreign inward investment that is helping to drive the UK economy and job creation. It is exactly this type of investment that will be lost to other competitor EU members if the UK votes to leave the European Union. The single market has enabled Ryanair to lead the low-fare air travel revolution in Europe, as we bring millions of British citizens to Europe each year, and welcome millions of European visitors to Britain, and we are calling on everyone to turn out in large numbers and vote remain.

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

Brexit may result in Ryanair’s formation of UK subsidiary. Ryanair has reported it may create a new subsidiary to operate UK domestic flights if a “hard Brexit” happens, the company said. Under the worst outcome, the UK would be forced to leave the European open-skies system as it exits the EU, which would thwart Ryanair as a European carrier from remaining to operate routes from London to Belfast, Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

It would then need to establish a separate UK company, of which Ryanair would be able to own a maximum of 49.9 percent. If the UK continues part of the open-skies area, the company said it forecasts no change in the ownership structures of Ryanair or UK carriers. Ryanair said airlines have been invited to a round table discussion organized by the government department charged with navigating the UK’s exit from the EU to discuss the impact this will have on their sector.

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

Ryanair has stepped up warnings that flights between the UK and Europe are jeopardized by Brexit, with the airline’s chief executive Michael O’Leary claiming that the prospect of upsetting aviation was one of the quickest and best ways for the EU27 to “stick it to the British”.

If Britain votes to leave it will be damaging for the UK economy and the European economy for the next two or three years … there’ll be huge uncertainty while Britain tries to negotiate an exit out of a single market and tries to replace that with a whole series of trade deals which they won’t get done … yet staying in is the way forward the British economy is performing fundamentally well at the moment … unemployment is low … the economy’s doing well … it’s one of the most competitive economies in Europe … this is the time to stay in and continue to benefit from European membership not leave now.

We speak as Britain’s largest airline we carry 40 million passengers to and from the UK this year we’re also a large foreign in word investor here in the UK I fly from 2060 British airports I employ more than three thousand pilots, cabin crew, and engineers and I want to keep investing in Britain I want to keep growing the business here in Britain but I can only do that if Britain remains a member of the European Union.

Were they not want to leave not just European Union but also the single market we may not be able to free to fly anymore between the UK and Europe as an Irish airline … now of course the UK is part of the European Union … it’s not part of the euro and the single currency … Ireland of course is there’s lots of criticisms about the future of the euro if it can survive in its current form overall has Ireland benefited from being a part of the single currency can the single currency survive as it is I think overall iron has benefits usually by being a member the single currency I think the single currency will survive because the strongest economy in Europe … Germany is behind the euro and I think they’ll do whatever needs to be done to make sure it does survive but there does need to be more harmonization between the outer relying countries the Greeks, the Italians, the Spanish, and the Irish who have suffered real economic problems in recent years as a result of very low interest rates and … you know property bubbles … but that’s why I a single market needs reform we’ve been very critical of Brussels and over-regulation and I think why this election will bring about more reform in Brussels as long as Britain votes to stay in.

Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary Protests Brexit in London with Funny Costume

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Posted in Airlines and Airliners Global Business

Ben Franklin’s Fable of The Lion And The Dog

Ben Franklin's Fable of The Lion And The Dog

In January 1770, in the London newspaper The Public Advertiser, Benjamin Franklin published a fable about a young lion cub and a large English dog traveling together on a ship.

A lion’s whelp was put on board a Guinea ship bound to America as a present to a friend in that country: it was tame and harmless as a kitten, and therefore not confined, but suffered to walk about the ship at pleasure. A stately, full-grown English mastiff, belonging to the captain, despising the weakness of the young lion, frequently took its food by force, and often turned it out of its lodging box, when he had a mind to repose therein himself The young lion nevertheless grew daily in size and strength, and the voyage being long, he became at last a more equal match for the mastiff; who continuing his insults, received a stunning blow from the lion’s paw that fetched his skin over his ears, and deterred him from any future contest with such growing strength; regretting that he had not rather secured its friendship than provoked its enmity.

'A Benjamin Franklin Reader' by Walter Isaacson (ISBN 0743273982) This is one of the many his articles, letters, hoaxes, and other pieces of political propaganda all aimed at convincing the British colonial powers that its oppressive treatment of the American colonies would sooner or later backfire. Franklin was acting in his capacity as the spokesman in London for several colonies.

Franklin “humbly inscribed” this to Lord Hillsborough, the British Secretary of State for the Colonies, who had become Franklin’s most ardent opponent.

Lord Hillsborough (Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire PC) served as the colonial secretary from 1768 to 1772, a critical period leading toward the American War of Independence.

For a great collection of the writings of Benjamin Franklin, see ‘A Benjamin Franklin Reader’ by Walter Isaacson. Not only was Franklin a self-made man, but he gave great advice about connecting with people and interacting with others both from a business and from a personal point of view.

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Posted in Leaders and Innovators Philosophy and Wisdom

The Comprehensive Benjamin Franklin Timeline

The Benjamin Franklin Timeline

Benjamin Franklin is revered as the truly distinguished American for his way of living. Assiduous, industrious, ingenious, opinionated, involved, entrepreneurial, intelligent, inquisitive, patriotic, and he lived to be old. He was a printer, a politician, an author, writer, and journalist. He was an inventor, a thinker, and a doer. He was an honest and righteous man who zealously wanted these colonies to be free, self-determining, flourishing, and protected.

He was one of the founders of the United States. America was very privileged to have this right man at the right time. He was well loved as a diplomat and he was a manufacturer of ink. This one man could have filled the lives of ten men with achievements and honors. Lastly, he was most mercifully and humanly flawed.

1706 … Born in Boston on January 17 (Jan. 6, 1705, Old Style). One of seventeen children born to his father, Josiah Franklin,and ten to his mother, Abiah Folger.

1714 … Attends Boston Latin School.

1718 … Apprenticed to brother James Franklin, a printer, who taught Ben the printing trade.

1722 … Writes Silence Dogood essays in the New-England Courant, his brother James’s newspaper.

1723 … Runs away to Philadelphia.

1724 … Moves to London with the intention to acquire equipment necessary for establishing another newspaper in Philadelphia.

1725 … Wrote pamphlet “A Dissertation on Liberty and Necessity, Pleasure and Pain” and, in it, rejected Christian dogma. Later regarded this pamphlet as an embarrassment.

1726 … Returns to Philadelphia.

1728 … Opens his own print shop.

1729 … Writes the “Busy-Body” series essays. Buys Pennsylvania Gazette.

1730 … Enters common-law marriage with Deborah Read. Son William born.

1731 … Founds Library Company of Philadelphia.

1732 … Son Francis born. Launches Poor Richard’s Almanac.

1733 … Moral Perfection Project that consists of twelve guidelines to help make himself morally perfect

1735 … Controversy over preacher Samuel Hemphill.

1736 … Clerk of Pennsylvania Assembly. Son Francis dies. Forms Union Fire Company, one of the first volunteer firefighting companies in America.

1737 … Made Philadelphia postmaster.

1741 … Launches General Magazine, which fails. Designs Franklin stove.

1743 … Daughter Sarah (“Sally”) born. Launches American Philosophical Society.

1745 … Collinson sends electricity pamphlets and glass tube.

'A Benjamin Franklin Reader' by Walter Isaacson (ISBN 0743273982) 1746 … Summer of electricity experiments.

1747 … Writes “Plain Truth.” Organizes militia.

1748 … Retires from printing business.

1749 … Writes proposal for the Academy (University of Pennsylvania).

1751 … Electricity writings published in London. Elected to Pennsylvania Assembly.

1752 … Kite and lightning experiment.

1753 … Becomes joint postmaster for America.

1754 … French and Indian War begins. Proposes Albany Plan of Union to create a unified government for the Thirteen Colonies.

1757 … Leaves for London as agent. Writes “Way to Wealth” and last Poor Richard’s Almanac. Moves in with Mrs. Stevenson on Craven Street in London.

1758 … Visits Ecton to research ancestry with son William.

1761 … Travels to Flanders and Holland with son William.

1762 … Returns to Philadelphia. Son William made royal governor of N.J., marries.

1763 … Postal inspection trip from Virginia to New England. French and Indian War ends.

1764 … Paxton Boys crisis. Defeated in bitter Assembly election. Returns to London as agent.

1765 … Stamp Act passes.

1766 … Testifies in Parliament against Stamp Act, which is repealed.

1767 … Townshend duties imposed. Travels to France.

1768 … Wages press crusade in London on behalf of the colonies.

1769 … Second visit to France.

1770 … Townshend duties repealed except on tea. Made agent for Massachusetts.

1771 … Begins Autobiography. Visits Ireland and Scotland.

1773 … Writes parodies “Rules by Which a Great Empire May Be Reduced to a Smaller One” and “Edict of the King of Prussia.” Boston Tea Party.

1775 … Returns to Philadelphia. Battles of Lexington and Concord. Elected to Second Continental Congress. Proposes first Articles of Confederation.

1776 … William removed as royal governor, imprisoned in Connecticut. Declaration of Independence. Goes to France with Temple and Benny.

1777 … Settles in Passy, feted throughout Paris.

1778 … Treaties of alliance and commerce with France.

1779 … Salons of Madames Brillon and Helvetius. John Paul Jones’s Bonhomme Richard defeats the Serapis.

1781 … Appointed (with Adams and others) to negotiate, in Paris, peace with Britain.

1785 … Last meeting with son William. Returns to Philadelphia.

1787 … Constitutional Convention. Elected president of Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery.

1790 … Dies on April 17 at age 84.

For a great collection of the writings of Benjamin Franklin, see ‘A Benjamin Franklin Reader’ by Walter Isaacson. Not only was Franklin a self-made man, but he gave great advice about connecting with people and interacting with others both from a business and from a personal point of view.

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Posted in Leaders and Innovators

Thermae Bath Spa: The Thermal Springs that Soothed Ancient Roman Conquerors

Thermae Bath Spa, Bath, England

As the sun sets across the Georgian rooftops of Bath, there is no finer place to be than wallowing in the steamy warmth of the rooftop pool at Thermae Bath Spa. It is the lone location in Britain where visitors can escape into spring water that is naturally heated. Hotel spas, even in Bath, make do with warmed tap water. Thermae uses mineral-rich spring water bubbling up from the limestone at 113 deg F—just like the Romans who built the intricate bathing complex that still stands a few hundred yards away.

There is a modern sense of luxury within the modern construction. More than 140 architects competed to win the contract. Nicholas Grimshaw’s winning design uses conventional Bath stone, like the Georgian buildings surrounding the spa, plus giant swaths of glass and idiosyncratic round portholes. This building also accommodates the Minerva Bath, the largest and most futuristically stylized of the three on offer, with massage jets, a whirlpool, and a “lazy river.”

Cross Bath, Thermae Bath, England The customary treatments are available, as well as private escapes to the restored Georgian Hot Bath and the secluded Cross Bath, a stand-alone bathhouse across the street built above the site of the original Roman cistern. At the main three-story spa, there is everything a latter-day Roman bather could want: scented steam saunas in circular glass pods, an indoor pool with gently flowing currents, bubbling foot baths, a huge shower big enough to soak a dozen people at once, and the highlight, a rooftop pool. The naturally heated rooftop pool on the spa’s New Royal Bath building is best enjoyed at night, when the skyline is floodlit. Visitors can take in a panorama that includes the ornate towers of 17th-century Bath Abbey in the center of town.

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Posted in Travels and Journeys

Monty Python’s Cheese Shop Skit

In this hilarious Cheese Shop skit from Monty Python’s Flying Circus, an increasingly exasperated veddy English customer played by John Cleese goes through a long list of varieties of cheeses with the shopkeeper, Mr. Wensleydale played by Michael Palin, only to find that this shop has no actual cheese to sell. Also see full script and list of cheese mentioned in the skit.

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Posted in Music, Arts, and Culture

Historic elegance and Fine English Hospitality of Bath’s Royal Crescent Hotel

Royal Crescent Hotel & Spa in Bath, England

Jane Austen fantasies come alive at this elegant hotel ideally situated in the middle of Bath’s architecturally celebrated Royal Crescent.

The Royal Crescent Hotel is situated in the middle of Bath’s beautiful eighteenth-century Royal Crescent. The Royal Crescent Hotel occupies two remarkable buildings virtually untouched since the eighteenth-century when the landed gentry of the day would visit Bath during the “season” for the water’s health-giving properties.

The exterior of the hotel looks much as it did 250 years ago, whereas inside, huge vases of fragrant lilies perfume the air, a fire crackles in the drawing room, and inconspicuous staff appears as if from nowhere precisely when you need them. The bedrooms have been lovingly restored to make certain they are just as they were in the eighteenth century. Carpets, color schemes, and furniture have all been meticulously chosen to ensure genuineness, but not at the expense or comfort.

Dower House, Royal Crescent Hotel, Bath The ideal magnitude of the Royal Crescent Hotel in Bath’s architecture, the cobblestones underfoot and the views of the hills around Bath and honey-colored municipality characterize English sophistication. The hotel, bang in the middle of this iconic-terraced Royal Crescent, is a neoclassical enchantment inside and out, as comfortable as can be, with fine dining, an even finer spa and unswervingly old-fashioned, first-class service.

For a spa, head to the Bath House, which offers a variety of treatments including a warm relaxation pool where gothic windows let natural light to flood in. After a few unhurried lengths, soak in one of the toasty hot tubs prior to steeling yourself for an stimulating plunge in one of the icy tubs of cold water, a practice said to do wonders for the blood circulation.

Of course, you do not need to stay for long to enjoy the best of the hotel: Do not give up eating at the Royal Crescent’s restaurant, the Dower House, which overlooks the garden. Alternatively, on a sunny day, find yourself a seat under a flower-adorned magnolia tree in the peaceful and secluded garden, listen to the birdsong, and enjoy an self-indulgent afternoon tea just like those elite Georgians did back in Bath’s heyday.

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Posted in Music, Arts, and Culture Travels and Journeys

The Rushdie Affair

Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses and The Rushdie Affair

The Rushdie Affair, or The Satanic Verses controversy, was the impassioned furious reaction of several Muslims to the publication of The Satanic Verses, a novel by British Indian novelist and essayist Salman Rushdie. The Satanic Verses was first published by Viking Press in the United Kingdom in 1988.

'The Satanic Verses: A Novel' by Salman Rushdie (ISBN 0812976711) Many Muslim authorities decried The Satanic Verses as blasphemous. Its distribution and sale were banned in India, Pakistan, South Africa, and Iran. The ireful reactions became dramatic in early 1989 when Muslims in England burned copies of the novel and protest and demonstrations in Pakistan ended in killings and injuries. On 14-Feb-1989, Iranian religious leader and politician Ayatollah Khomeini issued a fatwa urging Muslims the world over to execute those associated with the novel. The fatwa also placed a death sentence on Salman Rushdie and Viking Press, his publishers, for blasphemy against Islam. The sentence has never been discharged. The fatwa was eventually revoked under the rule of Mohammad Khatami in the late 1990s.

Recommended Reading

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Winston Churchill’s Famous Sense of Humor

Winston Churchill's Famous Sense of Humor

Winston Churchill was one of the most eminent and one of the most debated men of the 20th Century. Churchill was greatly admired at this time of his career (having just won the war) and recaptured his seat in Parliament to represent the Woodford constituency. The British people nevertheless were exhausted of war and didn’t regard Churchill and the Tory Party as the party to “lead the peace”. Therefore, even though Churchill was in Parliament, his party moved to the backbenches as the Labor Party took power and Clement Attlee became Prime Minister.

Churchill won the Second World War, but in the election of July 1945, he was defeated. Many thought that the British public showed flagrant thanklessness. Churchill was still a Member of Parliament, his party lost control of Parliament and thus by tradition the right to the position of Prime Minister.

When the news came out, Churchill was taking a bath (was there ever a statesman who spent more time in the bath?) He commented, “They have a perfect right to kick me out. That is democracy”. When he was offered the Order of the Garter, he asked, “Why should I accept the Order of the Garter, when the British people have just given me the Order of the Boot?”

Recollect Winston Churchill’s prominent dictum from a oration he made at the House of Commons on 11-Nov-1947: “Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.”

Churchill returned to power in 1951. The remark about democracy was made when he had lost power and had every reason to be bitter. Fortunately, he kept his sense of humor even in the most trying circumstances.

Best Books about Winston Churchill

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Romania’s Cheeky “Why don’t you come over?” Campaign for Tourists from Britain

Earlier in 2013, The Guardian revealed that the British government was considering an anti-immigration promotion in Romania and Bulgaria labeled, “You Won’t Like It Here.

Ministers of Her Majesty’s government were considering initiating a negative advertising campaign in Romania and Bulgaria to encourage potential immigrants to stay away from the UK. The campaign would spotlight some of the downsides of British life and was seen necessary to reduce immigration to Britain especially when limits that presently allowed Bulgarians and Romanians to live and work in the UK would run out.

People in the United Kingdom and in the European Union were bewildered the Brits’ indiscretion and lack of diplomacy.

A few weeks ago, Gandul, a Romanian daily newspaper, thought of a mischievous little campaign to get back at the Brits. The newspaper initiated a cheeky campaign labeled, “We May Not Like Britain, But You’ll Love Romania” and invited, “Why don’t you come over?” Gandul placed ads for the campaign on Facebook and other social media and even purchased some outdoor media in Britain.

The “Why don’t you come over?” campaign went viral and has come to be well admired. Best yet, it resulted in a substantial commercial for tourism in Romania. The campaign won a well-deserved Gold Award at AdStars, Asia’s biggest advertising-industry event. Watch a case study on YouTube.

“One draft beer is less expensive than your bottled water.”

One draft beer is less expensve than your bottled water: 'We May Not Like Britain, But You'll Love Romania' Campaign by Gandul, a daily Romanian newspaper

“Summer here lasts three months, not three hours.”

Summer here lasts three months, not three hours: 'We May Not Like Britain, But You'll Love Romania' Campaign by Gandul, a daily Romanian newspaper

“Charles bought a house here in 2005. And Harry has not been photographed naked once.”

Charles bought a house here in 2005. And Harry has not been photographed naked once: 'We May Not Like Britain, But You'll Love Romania' Campaign by Gandul, a daily Romanian newspaper

“We serve more food groups than pie, sausage, fish & chips.”

We serve more food groups than pie, sausage, fish & chips: 'We May Not Like Britain, But You'll Love Romania' Campaign by Gandul, a daily Romanian newspaper

“Your weekly rent covers a whole month here. Pub nights included.”

Your weekly rent covers a whole month here. Pub nights included: 'We May Not Like Britain, But You'll Love Romania' Campaign by Gandul, a daily Romanian newspaper

“Half of our women look like Kate. The other half, like her sister.”

Half of our women look like Kate. The other half, like her sister: 'We May Not Like Britain, But You'll Love Romania' Campaign by Gandul, a daily Romanian newspaper

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Posted in Global Business Travels and Journeys

Making history: The Beatles’ Abbey Road Album Iconic Cover

Conceivably, the most iconic illustration by the Beatles is the unforgettable image on album sleeve image on the album ‘Abbey Road.’ The image of the English rock band on the zebra crossing on Abbey Road, London, has become one of the most renowned and imitated in recording history. The crossing has become a popular destination for fans of the “Fab Four” as Beatlemania persists around the world.

Abbey Road Beatles Album Iconic Cover

The photograph of the “Fab Four” traversing the zebra crossing was based on the sketches and concepts by Paul McCartney. In the iconic cover, the group cross across the street in single file with John Lennon leading to the far right, followed by Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, and George Harrison. Not clearly visible is the fact that Paul McCartney is actually barefoot.

Not as popular is a picture taken prior to the iconic picture on the album sleeve. In this picture of the preparation, the innocence of the moment is truly remarkable. The Beatles are indeed oblivious to the significance of the iconic picture about to be captured of them crossing Abbey Road.

Making of Abbey Road Beatles

The picture of the Beatles crossing Abbey Road is frequently imitated as in this advertisement for the Volkswagen Beatle.

Abbey Road Volkswagen Beatles

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