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Quotations from Starbucks Founder Howard Schultz’s Book “Pour Your Heart Into It”

Howard Schultz‘s Pour Your Heart Into It touches on the best management and business practices and the techniques that Schultz used to found and lead Starbucks to the international coffee corporation it is today.

Starbucks has become an emblem of the current specialty coffee movement and a “hip” lifestyle. Starbucks coffee bars have opened in small towns and major cities alike, first in America, then around the world.

Starbucks Founder Howard Schultz

“Pour Your Heart Into It” Chapter Titles and Lead Quotations

Starbucks is a international coffee house chain with more than 17,000 stores. Founded in 1971 to roast coffee and sell it straight to drinkers at branded shops, it was only a regional company until Howard Schultz purchased it in 1987.

  • Chapter 1: Imagination, Dreams, and Humble Origins
    “It is only with the heart that one can see rightly. What is essential is invisible to the eye.”
    Antoine de Saint-Exupery in The Little Prince
  • Chapter 2: A Strong Legacy Makes You Sustainable for the Future
    “A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depend on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received.”
    Albert Einstein
  • Chapter 3: To Italians, Espresso is Like an Aria
    “Some men see things as they are and say ‘Why?’ I dream things that never were, and say ‘Why not?'”
    George Bernard Shaw, often quoted by Robert F. Kennedy
  • Chapter 4: Luck is the Residue of Design
    “Whenever you see a successful business, someone once made a courageous decision.”
    Peter Drucker
  • 'Pour Your Heart Into It' by Howard Schultz (ISBN 0786883561) Chapter 5: Naysayers Never Built a Great Enterprise
    “We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done.”
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Kavanagh
  • Chapter 6: The Imprinting of the Company’s Values
    “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”
    Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Chapter 7: Act Your Dreams with Open Eyes
    “Those who dream by night in the
    dusty recesses of their minds
    Awake to find that all was vanity;But the dreamers of day are dangerous men,
    That they may act their dreams with open
    eyes to make it possible.”
    T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia)
  • Chapter 8: If it Captures Your Imagination, it Will Captivate Others
    “Whatever you can do, or dream you can, … begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it.”
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Chapter 9: People are nor a Line Item
    “Wealth is the means and people are the ends. All our material riches will avail us little if we do not use them to expand the opportunities of our people.”
    John F. Kennedy, State of the Union address in January 1962
  • Chapter 10: A Hundred-story Building First Needs a Strong Foundation
    “The builders of visionary companies … concentrate primarily on building an organization—building a ticking clock—rather than on hitting a market just right with a visionary product idea.”
    Jim C. Collins, Built to Last
  • Chapter 11: Don’t Be Threatened by People Smarter Than You
    “The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men [and women] to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.”
    Theodore Roosevelt
  • Chapter 12: The Value of Dogmatism and Flexibility
    “The only sacred cow in an organization should be its basic philosophy of doing business.”
    Thomas J. Watson, Jr. “A Business and Its Beliefs,” quoted in Built to Last

How Starbucks Became Successful

  • Chapter 13: Wall Street Measures a Company’s Price, Not Its Value
    “There are only two guidelines. One, what’s in the long-term best interests of the enterprise and its stakeholders, supplemented by the dominant concern of doing what’s right.”
    Robert D. Haas, President, Levi Strauss & Co.
  • Chapter 14: As Long as You’re Reinventing, How About Reinventing Yourself?
    “The difference between great and average or lousy in any job is, mostly, having the imagination and zeal to re-create yourself daily.”
    Tom Peters, The Pursuit of Wow!
  • Chapter 15: Don’t Let the Entrepreneur Get in the Way of the Enterprising Spirit
    “No organizational regeneration, no national industrial renaissance can take place without individual acts of courage.”
    Harvey A. Hornstein, Managerial Courage
  • Chapter 16: Seek to Renew Yourself Even When You’re Hitting Home Runs
    “To stay ahead, always have your next idea waiting in the wings.”
    Rosabeth Moss Kanter
  • Chapter 17: Crisis of Prices, Crisis of Values
    “It is by presence of mind in untried emergencies that the native metal of a man is tested.”
    James Russell Lowell, “Abraham Lincoln,” in North American Review, ]anuary 1864
  • Chapter 18: The Best Way to Build a Brand is One Person at a Time
    “What comes from the heart, goes to the heart.”
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Table Talk
  • Chapter 19: Twenty Million New Customers are Worth Taking a Risk For
    “Security is mostly superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.”
    Helen Keller, The Open Door
  • Chapter 20: You Can Grow B1g and Stay Small
    “The fundamental task is to achieve smallness within large organization.”
    E. F. Schumacher, Small is Beautiful: Economics as If People Mattered
  • Chapter 21: How Socially Responsible Can a Company Be?
    “The evidence seems clear that those businesses which actively serve their many constituencies in creative, morally thoughtful ways also, over the long run, serve their shareholders best. Companies do, in fact, do well by doing good.”
    Norman Lear, Founder of the Business Enterprise Trust, Quoted in David Bollier’s Aiming Higher
  • Chapter 22: How Not to Be a Cookie-cutter Chain
    “Art is an adventure into an unknown world, which can be explored only by those willing to take risks.”
    Mark Rothko, In The New York Times, June 13, 1943
  • Chapter 23: When They Tell You to Focus, Don’t Get Myopic
    “If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too; …
    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!”
    Rudyard Kipling, “If”
  • Chapter 24: Lead with Your Heart
    “Leadership is discovering the company’s destiny and having the courage to follow it. … Companies that endure have a noble purpose.”
    Joe Jaworski of the Organizational Learning Center at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Starbucks Founder Howard Schultz's 'Pour Your Heart Into It'

Selections from Howard Schultz’s Analysis of Starbucks’ Spectacular Success

Schultz sponsored Starbucks as the “third place,” distinctive from home and work. Many of its shops have comfortable padded chairs and sofas. In recent years they offer free Wi-Fi for customers who want Internet access for their computers. Some Starbucks are in shopping malls, bookstores, supermarkets, college campuses, and airports. Baristas mix a range of coffee drinks.

  • “When you really believe—in yourself, in your dream—you just have to do everything you possibly can to take control and make your vision a reality. No great achievement happens by luck.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “I believe that the best way for an entrepreneur to maintain control is by performing well and pleasing shareholders even if his or her stake is below 50 percent. That risk is far preferable to the danger of heavy debt, which can limit the possibilities for future growth and innovation.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “It’s one thing to dream, but when the moment is right, you’ve got to be willing to leave what’s familiar and go out to find your own sound.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “Whatever your culture, your values, your guiding principles, you have to take steps to inculcate them in the organization early in its life so that they can guide every decision, every hire, every strategic objective you set.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “Every step of the way, I made a point to underpromise and overdeliver. In the long run, that’s the only way to ensure security in any job.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “If you want to build a great enterprise, you have to have the courage to dream great dreams. If you dream small dreams, you may succeed in building something small. For many people, that is enough. But if you want to achieve widespread impact and lasting value, be bold.”
    Howard Schultz
  • 'Onward How Starbucks Fought for Its Life' by Howard Schultz (ISBN 1609613821) “Treat people like family, and they will be loyal and give their all. Stand by people, and they will stand by you. It’s the oldest formula in business, one that is second nature to many family-run firms. Yet in the late 1980s, it seemed to be forgotten.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “While Wall Street has taught me a lot, its most enduring lesson is an understanding of just how artificial a stock price is. It’s all too easy to regard it as the true value of your company, and even the value of yourself.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “At a certain stage in a company’s development, an entrepreneur has to develop into a professional manager. That often goes against the grain.”
    Howard Schultz
  • “Whatever you do, don’t play it safe. Don’t do things the way they’ve always been done. Don’t try to fit the system. If you do what’s expected of you, you’ll never accomplish more than others expect.”
    Howard Schultz

The Recipe to Starbucks Success

The name Starbucks is borrowed from the first mate of the whaling ship in the Herman Melville novel Moby Dick. The logo for Starbucks is also nautical, a siren who in the original image had a mermaid’s tail.

The first Starbucks location opened in the United States, in Pike Place, Seattle in 1971 and the company developed globally with a brand recognition that has been compared to the longer standing, brand-distinctive McDonald’s Fast-food Empire.

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Posted in Business and Strategy Leaders and Innovators

Welcome to An Era of CEO Activism

Welcome to An Era of CEO Activism

Gone are the days when managers would shrink back from revealing their beliefs and viewpoints on matters that had little to do with their company’s routine endeavors.

Leaders should think carefully before jumping on the closest soapbox. Starbucks’s Founder and CEO Howard Schultz learned that the hard way in 2015 when he started the Race Together campaign in the aftereffects of the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Schultz inspired Starbucks baristas to converse about race relations with customers whilst serving them their morning coffee. That didn’t come down with easy. In due course, Starbucks dialed back the initiative.

  • Topic: Race relations. Starbucks’ Howard Schultz got into hot water after he launched Starbucks’ Race Together campaign which encouraged baristas to talk about race with customers.
  • Topic: Vaccination. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg incurred the wrath of anti-vaccine commenters when he posted a picture of his Infant daughter visiting the doctor for routine vaccinations.
  • Topic: Common Core Education. ExxonMobil’s Rex Tillerson aroused the ire of education advocates when he referred to American students as “products” that companies simply don’t want to buy.
  • Topic: Global Warming. Unilever’s Paul Polman has publicly maintained that businesses and governments should commit to environmentally sustainable practices.
  • Topic: LGBT Rights. CEOs of Salesforce, Apple, Intel, Dow, Bank of America, Facebook, Yahoo! and others have come out against a wave of anti-LGBT legislation in several states.
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Posted in Global Business Leaders and Innovators Management and Leadership

Starbucks and Pop Star Lady Gaga Create ‘Cups of Kindness’ Collection to Support Her ‘Born This Way’ Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Lady Gaga is notorious for her distinct aesthetic, which can be labelled as a social fantasy that espouses much of Andy Warhol’s Pop Art visualization yet twists it to signify present-day anxieties. Her dynamic quest to produce the memorable and rejoice the mercurial emphasizes the degree to which pop phenomenon has been affected by a period of extraordinary connectivity among consumers and cultural creators.

Lady Gaga’s wide-eyed hope gradually eroded as she became the most famous artist of the last decade.

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks is partnering with Lady Gaga’s Born This Way Foundation to spread a simple message—be kind.

Starting tomorrow (June 13), Starbucks will donate 25 cents from each one of its colorful Cups of Kindness beverages sold at participating Starbucks® stores in the United States and Canada through June 19 to Born This Way Foundation. Funds raised will go toward programs that support youth wellness and empowerment by fostering kindness, improving mental health resources, and creating more positive environments.

“We’re healthier and happier when we live our lives with compassion and our communities are stronger when we treat one another with generosity and respect,” said Lady Gaga. “Born This Way Foundation and I are so excited to partner with Starbucks to help inspire positivity and love through the Cups of Kindness collection.”

The new Starbucks Cups of Kindness collection features four vivid iced beverages hand-picked by Lady Gaga, including the new Matcha Lemonade and Violet Drink. The refreshing, nondairy drinks come in a rainbow of colors and are all under 150 calories for a grande size.

“I adore the entire collection and I instantly fell in love with the Matcha Lemonade,” she said.

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Born Stefani Germanotta, Lady Gaga is an avant-garde artist who makes the most of her art school background and combines aspects of performance, art, and fashion into a musical style that represents a distinctive multimedia melange philosophy.

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Lady Gaga’s pursuit of a sustaining cultural presence responds to hypermodern pressures through her elaborate performances and dress experimentation, which are deployed to create visual impressions that are essentially tailor-made for the age of viral marketing and produce expectations of ever impressive spectacles. She supplements this approach by attempting to obviously link herself to categories of individual uniqueness.

  • New Matcha Lemonade:  This vibrant green drink is made with finely ground Teavana® matcha green tea, combined with crisp lemonade then shaken with ice to create a refreshingly sweet, delicious drink.
  • New Violet Drink: The sweet blackberries and tart hibiscus of Very Berry Hibiscus Starbucks Refreshers™ Beverage swirl together with creamy coconutmilk and ice, creating a refreshing (and violet-hued) sip.
  • Ombre Pink Drink: A refreshing beverage that combines light, fruity Cool Lime Starbucks Refreshers™ Beverage with cool, creamy coconutmilk and a splash of Teavana® Shaken Iced Passion Tango™ Tea and a lime wheel, for a bright burst of hibiscus notes.
  • Pink Drink: A light and refreshing beverage that features the sweet strawberry flavors of Strawberry Acai Refreshers with accents of passion fruit and acai combined with coconutmilk, and topped with a scoop of strawberries. Included in Cups of Kindness collection in United States only.

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

By praising the “monster,” the “freak,” or the “misfit” in multiple expressions—not “fitting in” at school or being gay—Lady Gaga is able to build a sense of sociological connection among fans while the catch-all energy and dynamism of her music works to sustain mass appeal.

“Over the years we’ve admired the amazing work that Lady Gaga has led through Born This Way Foundation,” said Holly Hinton, director of Music and Artist Programming. “We are proud to introduce the Cups of Kindness collection to raise awareness and fund the Foundation’s efforts to spread kindness, support youth and make the world a better place.”

One program that will benefit from the Cups of Kindness initiative is Born This Way Foundation’s Channel Kindness, a platform featuring stories of kindness as documented by young people from around the United States. These youth reporters, ages 16 to 24, have been recruited to identify and document the acts of generosity, compassion, and acceptance that shape communities. 

Starbucks has committed to a minimum $250,000 contribution to the Born This Way Foundation.

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

What the world of popular culture has in Lady Gaga is a young, sexy, tradition-busting performer. Her musical influences part from Bowie and Queen, detail the influence of a line of obvious women performers: Madonna, Grace Jones, Spears, Debbie Harry, Gwen Stefani, Christina Aguilera and Kylie Minogue. If one asks the fans of Lady Gaga why she is more charming than other stars, they would be likely to emphasize the individual investment and connection of Lady Gaga herself and thus the mutuality of the relation. What the business world has in Lady Gaga is a new icon of marketing.

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Lady Gaga will not permit qualified photographers near her when she performs, but she promotes her fans to take pictures and videos and publish them without restrictions on the internet. Even with her hit single, ‘Born This Way’, she appears to agonize less about copyright and more about fan devotion. When a ten-year-old Canadian teenager published her own adaptation of the song online, Lady Gaga watched it, admired it and encouraged the girl to perform with her before a live audience at some point. In ways like these, the star advances her followers over herself.

There is something heroic about the way my fans operate their cameras. So precisely, so intricately and so proudly. Like Kings writing the history of their people, is their prolific nature that both creates and procures what will later be perceived as the kingdom. So the real truth about Lady Gaga fans, my little monsters, lies in this sentiment: They are the Kings. They are the Queens. They write the history of the kingdom and I am something of a devoted Jester.

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Lady Gaga’s new connection between performance and theory, pop culture and viewpoint is bolstering because it provides a source of sincerity, passion, and action, and a heart for mirroring on a mass produced sophistication that however has Lady Gaga’s genius to replicate bits of itself to itself in a cycle of disapproval that produces something new to say and show.

Credits: Corporate images from Starbucks’media website and Starbucks chalkboard images from Starbucks associates’Reddit posts

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

Starbucks and Lady Gaga Create Cups of Kindness for Born This Way Foundation

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Posted in Music, Arts, and Culture

Philanthropy and The Passion of Bill Gates

Forbes 400 Summit on Philanthropy In June 2015, about 200 billionaires, outstanding philanthropists and social entrepreneur-game changers convened in New York for the annual Forbes 400 Summit on Philanthropy. The high spot of the event was the presentation of lifetime accomplishment awards to Bill and Melinda Gates, and Paul Farmer, cofounder of Partners in Health. The invention or development should be of great significance scientifically, should be agenda setting, and undeniably must have had a chief influence, both in terms of the development of the field and its applications to advance mankind. The rule is that that the accomplishment should not have been marked by another major prize. This means that the reward should not come too long after the invention, discovery or development. This is why our winners occasionally receive the Nobel Prize and not the other way around.

Paul Farmer, Partners in Health Recalling Bill Gates’s passion for philanthropy and his ability to focus on the task at hand, Paul Farmer reminisced,

I was traveling with Bill once in Africa and we decided to go up to the top of this mountain to see the gorillas up close. We’re sitting there, and there’s this beautiful silver-backed gorilla not 5 feet from Bill Gates. And he turns around to me and goes, “Now, where were we in talking about this tuberculosis vaccine?”

Warren Buffett and Bill Gates Philanthropy In a planet with many celebrities but few heroes, Bill Gates has reached superhuman status by pledging much of his massive fortune to the improvement of global equity. He and his wife have directed the causes of health disparities between rich and poor, and their foundation has become a mainspring in international aid and in research on AIDS and other diseases. In June, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s likely influence on global health was augmented when Warren Buffett, the world’s second-richest man, broadcast plans to give most of his fortune to the foundation established by the richest one. At the same event, Warren Buffett noted the following on Bill and Melinda Gates:

When I was deciding how to give away my money nine years ago, I reached out to Bill and Melinda Gates and struck the kind of deal I usually make: they do all of the work and I sit back and watch. I’ve studied this country’s great philanthropists: Rockefeller, Carnegie. Henry Ford, you name them. None of them ever poured remotely the amount of personal time, effort, and brainpower into their foundations that Bill and Melinda have.

When the Buffett gift was announced, some observers expressed concern that aid from other sources would decline because the Gates Foundation would be perceived as rich enough to solve the developing world’s health problems.

Philanthropy and The Passion of Bill Gates Venture philanthropy has thrived general philanthropy as a controlling principle in concept and in language. The conversion further blurs the line between the private and the public. Foundations have moved away from setting general humanitarian goals and making grants to outside groups for research and for achievement programs in keeping with the foundation’s general purposes. Foundations today set more specific policy goals and then either create or seek out establishments that will carry out projects for which the significances are set by the foundation. Some of the foundations no longer consent unsolicited applications. Instead of a listing of grants, they are now titled a collection of “investments” directed toward achieving a policy goal. The foundations reinforce research that “aligns with our investment strategy.” The Gates Foundation speaks about its “program-related investments” when speaking of its payments in chase of its aims. Accepting the award, Bill Gates noted:

I have had a lot of fun jobs, but none of them has been as fun as partnering with Melinda and seeing real results. My favorite graph is the one that shows childhood death has been cut in half in 25 years, and my favorite prediction is that we’ll cut it in half again.

I see philanthropy as the venture capital tor government functions. There are certain things the private sector will never fund like fighting malaria or fixing primary health systems, because there is no profit model there. Governments want to fund those things, but it’s difficult for them to work on really long-term issues and to attract the right scientists to solve those problems. Philanthropy can take the risks, do the research and development, and fund the pilot programs to tackle some of the most critical issues in the world.

The late 19th century brought the Gilded Age, with riches created by inventions and opportunities. In the 20th century, capitalism was directed by the managerial revolution that fashioned huge corporations and personal fortunes but also repressed innovation, limited new opportunities, and widened the gap in the distribution of wealth. Executive capitalism is now being replaced by the entrepreneurial capitalism stage, a second Gilded Age, which Acs identifies as the New American Capitalism. Entrepreneurial capitalism necessitates a philanthropy (as represented by Warren Buffett and Andrew Carnegie) that ploughs fortunes into society to offer opportunities for entrepreneurs and capital for entrepreneurial activities such as business incubators. Corporate capitalism reinvigorated traditionally manly rhetoric and actions, from paternalism and self-control to the Great Father and the warrior ethos. Abstracted loyalties to gender and race intensified, and gestures of masculinization saturated American culture. Nor have they slackened much in or own post-millennial atmosphere of white male pathos and bathos. Yet it’s not enough to say that manhood developed new forms of contestation and patriarchal performativity as men’s work alienated their gender codes from their gendered bodies. The rise of large-scale organizations threatened manhood’s usefulness.

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Posted in Philosophy and Wisdom

Stephen Fry on Respect for Devout and Pious Members of the Catholic Church

In October 2009, English comedian, actor, writer, and humanitarian Stephen Fry joined provocateur extraordinaire Christopher Hitchens to debate against former Member of British Parliament Ann Widdecombe and the Archbishop of Abuja, John Onaiyekan on the topic of ‘Is Catholicism a force for good in the world?‘. Television and radio journalist Zeinab Badawi moderated the session hosted by Intelligence Squared held at the Methodist Central Hall in Westminster.

Fry’s passionate and emotional speech opened with a reiteration of his respect for individuals’ choice of Catholic faith and appealed for their respect for others’ choices too:

I want first of all to say that I have no quarrel, no argument and I wish to express no contempt for individual devout and pious members of that church. They are welcome to their sacraments. They’re welcome to their reliquaries and to their Blessed Virgin Mary. They’re welcome … to their faith, to the importance they place in it, … to the comfort and the joy that they receive from it. All of that is absolutely fine by me. It would be impertinent and wrong of me to express any antagonism towards any individual who wishes to find salvation in whatever form they wish to express it. That, to me, is sacrosanct, as much as any article of faith is sacrosanct to anyone of any church or any faith, in the world. It’s very important. It’s also very important to me, as it happens, that I have my own beliefs. They are a belief in the enlightenment. They are a belief in the eternal adventure of trying to discover moral truth in the world.

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Posted in Faith and Religion Philosophy and Wisdom

Four Traits of a Virtuous Company

In an article in the 23-Feb-2015 issue of Bloomberg Businessweek magazine, Susan Berfield discusses the dilemmas of a private business founded on the principals of “doing good” going public. Berfield contends that such companies must now respond to every demand of the public company relative to its mission. The article features The Container Store, founded in 1978 in Dallas, TX.

'Conscious Capitalism' by John Mackey, Rajendra Sisodia (ISBN 1625271751) Here are four traits of a virtuous company, as defined by Conscious Capitalism, Inc., an organization founded by Whole Foods Market founder John Mackey:

  1. A purpose other than making money, though the company should make money too.
  2. A focus on employees, customers, suppliers, the community and its ecosystem—and shareholders.
  3. A leader who seeks to bring out the best in people.
  4. A culture that fosters love and trust.

Berfield contends that companies that abide by the tenets of conscious capitalism have generated handsome returns for investors. Examples include

Starbucks, Chipotle, Whole Foods, Costco, Panera, and Southwest Airlines.

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Posted in Business and Strategy

Identify the Best Volunteer Opportunities

Identify the Best Volunteer Opportunities Winston Churchill once said, “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” Whether it is due to frustration about the status quo of a service or a community organization, a sense of duty, or some other reason to contribute and become a better person, many people respond to the needs of volunteerism by donating their time and energy to a variety of causes and charities. There are evidently many ways for you to serve in the community. Volunteering is a great way to learn about community issues, develop life skills, expand your resume, explore areas of professional or personal interest, and meet recognized community needs.

Here’s how you can explore potential volunteer opportunities in your community and establish a match.

  1. Perform a self-assessment. Think about your motivations, strengths, interests, needs, and objectives. What do you hope to achieve or draw from the experience? What would you like to do, in what capacity? What causes interest you? What contributions can boost your self-esteem? What population and constituencies do you want to work with? How much time commitment can you give?
  2. Volunteerism Research volunteer positions available in your community. Talk to the local non-profits and civic bodies and ask for connections and referrals.
  3. Differentiate between various opportunities and the organizations you can be engaged with. Think about the expectations of the position and the precise specific responsibilities of the service opportunity. What are the hours and the time commitment required? What opportunities and causes fit with your goals, values, and skills?
  4. Ask for an orientation. Meet with the volunteer coordinator, director, or manager of the organization you want to serve and be acquainted with the organization, its mission, people it serves and responsibilities of your role.

A good volunteer opportunity is a great way to enrich your life experience, make an impact on your community, get more meaning to your life, or build your resume. Be sure to include some time to reflect on your experiences. Network and learn.

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Posted in Education and Career