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How to Build Trust in a New Job

How to Build Trust in a New Job

Many leaders in transition often do things that damage their career success. Leaders are most vulnerable during this time because they are developing new relationships, trying to affect change, and feeling pressure to meet the high expectations of others.

To put these principles into action, leaders need a six-point agenda:

  • Get an early start. Before starting a new position, learn about the company’s history, culture, strategy, competitors, and learn the names and responsibilities of colleagues.
  • Meet and greet. Meet as many people as possible, especially the informal leaders or influencers. Tools such as email, voice mail, or the company newsletter are helpful, but should not replace face-to-face meetings. Many leaders get too caught up in pleasing the boss, or in solving problems, at the expense of those who will execute the changes. Making time to listen to even the most disgruntled employees will pay off in more trust and connection.
  • Learn the critical success factors. Identify areas where the most impact or improvement can be made. Focus on one or two, ask a lot of questions, get input from key opinion-makers, and when make recommendations, back them up. Also learn what is going well, and how to leverage those areas by building continuity from the old to the new.

Learn the critical success factors.

  • Set clear priorities. At the start of any new role, you need to decipher what is important, and what is not. And then constantly reassess the message. In developing your top priorities and vision, you will gain a dear focus, demonstrate credibility, and establish a clear cause for people below to rally behind. Make sure to involve key people, as they will offer more support for what they helped create.
  • Secure early wins. During the first 100 days, a leader wants people to feel that something is different, something good is happening. Celebrate some early successes to gain the confidence of followers. To secure early wins, first identify problems that can be tackled and solved quickly, and whose solutions will yield highly visible results. These few small wins will also demonstrate competence and consistency that provides the trust for larger initiatives.
  • Plant seeds for the future. The momentum that began with small wins must be leveraged to support your longer-range vision of the future. Small change is easy, but transformational change will require coalitions of support. By including a few key individuals in your planning, you will build “referent trust” that will cascade to a broader audience as you move forward.

Sure distrust is high, leaders need to build trust early in their tenure.

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Posted in Education and Career

Career Success Depends on Your Ability to Motivate Individuals and Teams to Get the Right Results

Nothing leaders do is more significant than getting results. But you can’t get many results by yourself—you need people to help you. And the best way to have others help you is by motivating them to accomplish results. The old paradigm, which says revenue growth and shareholder-value growth are interrelated, does not go far enough toward clarifying how the best companies produce value. Try using these three motivation principles.

Principle #1 of Motivation: Motivation is Material Accomplishment

Ways to Increase Employee Motivation “Motivation” has common roots with “motor,” “momentum,” “motion,” and “mobile.” These words represent movement and action. Motivation isn’t about what people think or feel but what they do. When motivating people to get results, challenge them to take those actions that will achieve desired results.

You will be more competitive when your people, instead of being ordered to go from point A to point B, want to go from point A to point B. They will “want to” when they believe in your leadership. This predisposition cannot be helped because of indispensable variances in the program designers’ backgrounds. But eventually, a single approach is too constricted. To design learning experiences that work, leadership training will have to integrate more meritoriously all four approaches into a solitary program. Consequently, leadership training has budged toward teaching managers and executives how to expect what is on their industry skyline and how to mobilize their organization to shape the future.

The first step in conscripting their belief in your leadership is for you believe in them and to value the work they do. Express your belief that they can get the results you are asking of them. Tell them how much you appreciate their hard work. For many companies, leadership training then basically befalls a quick-fix answer to greater problems.

But believing is not enough. Motivation means people take the precise actions they need to take to make happen what you want to have happen. Encourage people to write down three precise things that they need from you to help them get increased results.

Principle #2 of Motivation: Motivation is Propelled by Emotion

The Meaning of Motivation in Management Emotion and motion come from the same Latin root meaning “to move”. When you want to move people to take action, engage their emotions. People need a strong emotional commitment (motivation) to take action and realize the goal. The key is to visualize the future as having numerous possibilities and to develop intuition about relative probability by revealing ourselves to a wide gamut of successes and failures.

When I explained this to the chief marketing officer of a services company, he said, “Now I know why we’re not growing! We (senior leaders) established our marketing strategy in a bunker! He showed me his 40-page strategy document. The points were logical, consistent, and all-inclusive. It made perfect sense—to the senior leaders. But it did not make experiential sense to the people who had to carry it out. Since they had no input into the strategy, they disrupted the implementation in many innovative ways. Only when people are motivated—emotionally committed—to functioning the strategy, does it have a chance to succeed.

Principle #3 of Motivation: Inspiration is What Others Do to Themselves, Not What You Do to Them

You and I can’t motivate anybody to do anything. The people we want to motivate can only motivate themselves. The motivator and motivatee are always the same person. Leaders communicate, but individuals must motivate themselves. So, our “motivating” others to get results really entails our creating an atmosphere in which they can motivate themselves to get those results. On top of that, there is the very important role of setting direction and in communicating that direction.

Create the Right Climate to Motivate Employees For example, one leader almost encountered a mutiny when he presented next year’s goals—numbers much higher than the previous year’s goals. The staff went ballistic. “You expect us to get much higher numbers? No way!” He told me. “I know we can hit those numbers. I just have to get my people motivated!” I recommended that he create an environment in which his people could motivate themselves. So, he had them measure what activities got results. They discovered that they spent 60 percent of their time on work that had nothing to do with getting results. He then had them develop a plan to eliminate the pointless work. Once in charge of their own destiny, they got motivated! They established a great plan and started to get great results.

A good number of leadership programs have a half-life of a few days or weeks after the conferences close. Few have established passable transfer mechanisms to bring leadership skills back alive to the office, and most are captives of a single pedagogic method that imitates the teaching of their instructors.

Create the Right Climate to Motivate Employees

At the moment, there are adequate incentives for people to perform, based on the recognition that they accomplish what we thought they should to achieve. The point is that there are people to talk to who have an in-depth, long-term appreciation of the company and who know what is really going on.

Your career success depends on the ability of managers to motivate individuals and teams to get the results. The best ways to recognize others and celebrate accomplishments is best done by:

# setting high standards,

# discovering people doing things right,

# being innovative with rewards,

# acknowledging others in public, and

# personalizing rewards.

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Create Partners, Not Employees or Followers

People want to succeed. The vast majority want to feel good about themselves and their work. Nevertheless, sometimes, it is tremendously difficult to balance day-to-day duties with the emotional needs of your employees.

There are no quick fixes or simple formulas for generating a culture that unleashes the competency of people. It occasionally requires intervention into a number of dimensions of organizational life: challenging management philosophy and practices, communicating and aligning everyone to the business strategy, cultivating processes and systems, providing training in social and business skills, etc.

Whom would you rather have at your side in a tough spot? A partner who shares full responsibility for decisions and their outcomes? Alternatively, a subordinate who does just what you say and shuts up about ideas he has that may be better.

Rationally, you want the former; emotionally, you may choose the latter. Leaders bow to a multitude of short-term pressures: severe demands for quarterly earnings, risk aversion, distress with uncertainty, resistance to change, linear extrapolation from past experience, and reluctance to cannibalize established businesses.

'It's Okay to Be the Boss' by Bruce Tulgan (ISBN 0061121363) Reflect on your career. Have you ever kept quiet when superiors were creating problems? What caused you to withhold your counsel?

I guarantee you they were being “the boss.” Everything about their tone, body language, verbal language, and behavior was indicating you that they were the boss and you were the subordinate. Chances are you learned from them what a boss looks and sounds like. Whether you admired their style or not, some of it rubbed off on you.

When you act as a superior, you will have subordinates. Act as a partner, and you will have partners. Yes, you may be the senior partner, but they are still partners, not underlings, or subordinates.

One key dissimilarity between the behavior of a “boss” and a “partner” is the way you talk. You talk differently to partners. It is not just what you say, but how you say it. To a subordinate, you might say, “This client wants his order fulfilled now. Make it happen.”

What is the message? It is not just “Get the order done now,” but it is also “I’m the boss; this is what I want—and there could be outcomes if I don’t get it.” It does not require a dramatic act to make the point that the receiver is your subordinate. Are you aware of how often and in how many ways you send similar messages?

This is not how you would talk to a partner. You might be just as clear about what you want and when; however, your delivery would create partnership, not subservience. You might ask, “How can we do that?” Alternatively, “Can you make it happen?” You would seek the individual’s knowledge, responsibility, and mutual obligation. When employees are seen as partners, they will understand that their leaders do not simply see them as the means to achieve their own personal targets.

You talk differently to folks below you than to folks across from or above you. So what? The higher you go, the less direct experience you have of customers, stakeholders, and problems. It is harder to get a real feel for what is happening. You become more reliant on on good information and insight from those who are in touch. So, they need to feel invited to tell you the reality they see, especially when it differs from the one you believe is out there.

You likely think that you already extend this encouragement, but you may discourage people from giving you inconvenient information. Unless you make an effort to discover in what ways you do this, you will continue to do so.

Create Partners with Your Subordinates

Create Partners with Your Subordinates

To create partners and have your employees’ best interests in mind, try this exercise:

  • Start every meeting with a question: “Is there anything I’m not getting about this issue that you think I should?”
  • Whatever the answer, respond with interest and ask, “Can you tell me more about that or give an example to help me understand it better?”
  • Ask questions until you have clarity on the points. Do not argue. Do not cross-examine—just clarify.
  • Thank the individual or group making these points.
  • Incorporate what makes sense into the decisions.
  • If no one spoke up, after the meeting ask the individual who is likely to be forthright, “What am I doing that keeps everyone from talking?”
  • If this individual gives you insight into how you dissuade feedback, convey your gratefulness. Find a way to reward the honesty.
  • Invite this truth-teller to sit in on more meetings and after each one gives you feedback on anything you did that made others act as subordinates.

Simple Ways to Build Trust With Your Employees

Build Trust with Your Employees

Trust is established when even the newest rookie, a part-timer, or the lowest paid employee feels important and part of the team. This begins with management not being reserved, as well as getting out and meeting the troops.

'The 27 Challenges Managers Face' by Bruce Tulgan (ISBN 111872559X) By doing this you will have the self-awareness to create partners. You will also have earned their trust. They will give you their best advice and devotedly support decisions that are based on reality.

By creating this environment where your employees are treated as partners working toward a shared purpose, you will foster in your employees a sense of ownership not simply to their job, but to the whole process. This will inspire not only partnership between the company’s divisions/teams, but it will also help nurture innovation as employees are stimulated to look beyond what they usually work on or how they approach their job.

Good partners invest time and energy in making cognizant judgments about who their leaders are and what they espouse. Then they take the appropriate action.

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Posted in Management and Leadership

Servant Leadership: See and Serve

Servant Leadership

For the past decade, we have focused primarily on the what of leadership, and only tangentially on the why of leadership. Of course, the whole concept of leadership is problematic today because modern technology has produced prosperity and a growing professional class of independence, competence, security, and self-confidence.

All of this has led to the egalitarian anti-hierarchical spirit of the age, which threatens to make traditional management unimportant and leaders dispensable. The mystical charm of “being managers” has been drastically reduced as the fulcrum of the problem-solving has shifted to professionals, of course, without the power or authority.

Servant Leadership Today

I now define leadership simply as the vision to see, the ability to serve, and the skill to design and sell and implement a strategy that meets the first two criteria.

The vision to see is to have an accurate assessment of where you are, where you want to go, and how you plan to get there. The vision to see includes manpower, methods, and motivation. Organizations, like individuals, are born, grow to maturity, establish their identity, and use this to create their niche in the marketplace, and then grow less nimble and flexible and ultimately decline.

As the individual has to reinvent himself at different stages of his life to remain competent and competitive, so also does an organization. As the individual’s vision becomes more myopic, requiring the aid of glasses, contacts, or laser surgery, so also must an organization install corrective devices to focus and see things as they are rather than as they once were or as they should be.

The organization’s culture, communications, and competence are closely tied to manpower, methods, and motivation.

Culture is the invisible hand that dictates what is acceptable and what is not acceptable. The structure of work determines the workplace culture; the culture represents the values and beliefs; these drive behaviors. The function of work determines the structure of work, the structure of work determines the workplace culture, and the culture prescribes organizational behavior. If the organization knows what it wants to achieve and is structured to accomplish that goal, behavior will be purposeful, and the goal will be achieved. The goal or objective plus the appropriate culture equals purposeful performance.

Manpower relates to having the right mix of people to do the jobs required with the appropriate training and skills. This demands an assessment of readiness of skills available, a talent bank, and a critical analysis of changing manpower needs.

Servant Leadership: Motivation and Methods

Methods involve the infrastructure of how work is done. If you design a company where there are discrete departments, work will follow territorial imperatives out of which develop pecking orders, levels of elitism, and status. Conversely, teamwork cells represent an organic approach where departments and functions are integrated into a common goal, and support each other in user-friendly terms.

Motivation is the litmus test of productivity, which is based on the perception of control and satisfaction as a function of structure. Morale and motivation are often confused. You can have high morale and low productivity. You likely won’t have high motivation and low productivity. Morale is an effect, not a cause. Motivation is a cause, and motivation is not directly tied to incentives.

Incentives are meant to put a fire under you. Motivation involves creating a fire in you. Motivation ties into the third part of my definition of leadership where selling is involved. Incentives are external stimuli in the form of rewards to workers who are dependent on the reward giver. Motivation is inner directed and represents the self-satisfaction of a job well done. Incentives are manipulative devices successful with other-directedness, while motivation is enabling or selfdirected. It is the difference between a worker going to management with a problem and a worker going to management with a solution.

Incentives work well when a passive work force is the norm, where management acts as parent to workers. Those days are gone. No organization can afford a passive and dependent work force.

Today 80 percent of the work force is white-collar and college-trained. Knowledge power beats position power. Lateral communications or horizontal integration of effort at the operating level is critical to success, not vertical directives from policy makers remotely located at the top. Timeliness is critical in decision-making, meaning most decisions must be made at the level of consequences to ensure success.

Servant Leadership: Motivation and Morale

Motivation and morale dovetail if success is to be realized. Motivation is based on the attitude of the individual. Attitude is a predisposition to act in a certain way. Morale is a corporate or group index. These have been confused, as companies have created cultures of comfort and complacency in an attempt to raise morale, thinking high morale was the key to productivity and that motivation would follow naturally. Supporters of this concept give workers everything but the kitchen sinkrecreational complexes, liberal policies, generous benefits, paid leaves-and few, if any, of these benefits are tied to productivity measures. Even performance appraisal becomes a routine exercise for incremental raises. Cultures of comfort and complacency are merely fun places to go and socialize; work is not necessarily the primary focus. What motivates people most is a culture that provides clear work objectives, the training and tools to accomplish tasks, the trust that they will perform well, the freedom and control of the work, the support needed when they fall short of the mark, and a fair economic split in company profits. These people don’t need a lot of bells and beads, slogans, or rah-rah sessions. This is the culture of contribution as opposed to that of comfort and complacency because workers own what they do and are pro-active rather than reactive.

When people are provided with challenging work and measured and rewarded fairly with regard to that work, motivation, morale, and productivity follow. The focus of morale is on the work climate; the focus of motivation is on the job. Leadership with a vision to see blends these two factors to support productive work.

The second factor in leadership is the ability to serve. Leaders must be complete followers. They must have the best interests of those they serve in mind, and know them as they know themselves—how they think, feel, believe and behave; what they value, why they value it, and what are their greatest hopes and fears. Otherwise, their ability to serve is a charade. That does not mean the leader gives people all that they want, but rather that he helps them find the way to what they need. The goals of the company and the needs of the workers are interdependent. It would be wrong to meet goals at the expense of the workers, but it would be equally counter-productive to meet the needs of the workers at the expense of company goals. The leader behaves not as a concerned parent but as an honest broker, sharing with workers his vision of where they are, where they are going, and how they might get there. This means he shares information strategically, enabling workers to make decisions appropriate to the work at hand and the company’s best interests.

Moreover, the ability to serve does not suggest that what is proposed is always necessarily supported by the majority. The majority often has a vested interest in the status quo, and the status quo may be what is derailing the operation.

Some CEOs are culpable for malfeasance, corruption, cover-up, or cooking the books, but to me their greatest crimes are lack of vision, betrayal of those they serve, and failure to create a cohesive and winning strategy in the face of bold new challenges.

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Posted in Management and Leadership

How Do You Inspire Others

How Do You Inspire Others

Leaders who are rated as “highly inspirational” are also rated high in the following three areas:

  1. Have positive expectations of others. Inspirational leaders have faith in the people with whom they work. They believe that others are capable of great accomplishments. They believe others will work hard, follow through on assignments, and do whatever is needed to achieve goals. Having positive expectations of others predisposes leaders to expect more, check less, and encourage people to give their best.
  2. Get people the resources they need to do the job. Leaders often create a compelling vision of what needs to be done; however, as employees start to do the real work, they look for the resources to support them, only to find that systems don’t work, equipment is on order, or added personnel can’t be hjred. Leaders who inspire provide needed resources at the same time.
  3. Ask for input. When communicating, most people concentrate on their message and how it is delivered. Yet one of the strongest competencies for communicating powerfully is involving others—asking others for their input and encouraging alternative approaches. Leaders rated low give their prepared presentation but fail to ask for input from the audience.
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Posted in Management and Leadership Mental Models and Psychology

Shared Leadership to Use Hidden Assets Around You

Shared Leadership to Use Hidden Assets Around You

Most leadership development efforts only focus on formal leaders, or persons being groomed for leadership. However, followers also need to be included in leadership development efforts to prepare them for responsible self-leadership and to effectively practice shared leadership, especially in team-based knowledge work.

To prepare for the leadership challenges of tomorrow, we need to abandon some popular myths regarding the meaning of leadership today. This mythology centers on the romantic conception of top-down “heroic leadership.” Many people are drawn to the image of a larger-than-life, charismatic, all-knowing, heroic leader who can inspire and single-handedly transform work systems and the people who work in them. This image is an oversimplification of leadership.

Self Leadership And Shared Leadership

Self-leadership and shared leadership are at the heart of the new leadership forms needed to meet our challenges.

  • Self-leadership. People are capable of leading themselves. Self-leadership goes beyond participation and empowerment. Self-leadership does involve self-management of behavior to meet existing standards and objectives, but it also includes evaluating the standards and setting or changing them. It looks at what should be done and why it should be done in addition to how to do it. And it includes internal motivation, self management of thoughts, and developing various specific self-leadership skills, including self-observation, self-goal-setting, self-reward, rehearsal, self-job redesign, self-management of internal dialogues, and mental imagery. Such self-leadership strategies hold promise for meeting the empowerment challenges posed for members in teambased knowledge work systems.
  • Shared Leadership. Shared leadership occurs when all members are fully engaged in the leadership of the team. It includes ongoing and mutual leadership from both official and unofficial leaders. It is a key characteristic of empowerment in teams, providing more robust leadership than simple reliance on top leadership. This is particularly important in knowledge work, since a formal leader is often at a significant knowledge disadvantage relative to many team members on many important issues for the team.

Here are five ways you can unleash self and shared leadership to leverage the abilities of knowledge workers:

  • Avoid authoritarian control, of knowledge workers. Empower everyone.
  • Don’t rely too much on any one individual in knowledge creation. Encourage everyone to be involved.
  • Avoid the ego trap of wanting to be the top-down heroic leader. Encourage others to step forward as leaders when they have the key skills and knowledge.
  • Avoid hoarding power and influence. Provide the training and resources that enable others to step up to the plate.
  • Don’t always offer your opinion first. Ask the four most important words in management, “What do you think?”

Shared leadership is a better predictor of team success and team performance than the leadership of a formally designated leader.

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Posted in Education and Career Management and Leadership

How to Create a Culture of Accountability

How to Create a Culture of Accountability

Most people view accountability as something that belittles them or happens only when performance wanes, problems develop, results suffer, something goes wrong, or someone seeks to identify the cause of the problem, all for the sake of pinning blame and pointing the finger. When things sail along smoothly, people rarely ask, “Who is accountable for this success?”

Most dictionaries define accountability in a negative view. Consider Webster’s definition: “subject to having to report, explain, or justify; being answerable and responsible.” The words “subject to” imply little choice in the matter. This suggests that accountability is a consequence for poor performance, something you should fear or avoid. When people experience accountability this way, they shun it and justify poor results.

We need a more positive and powerful definition of accountability. Consider ours: “A personal choice to rise above your circumstances and demonstrate the ownership necessary to achieve desired results.

This definition includes a mindset of asking, “What else can I do to rise above my circumstances and achieve the desired results?” It involves seeing it, owning it, solving it, and doing it, and requires making, keeping, and answering for personal commitments. Such a perspective embraces current and future efforts rather than reactive, historical explanations. With this new definition, you can help yourself and others do everything possible to overcome difficult circumstances and achieve desired results.

Accountability in Action

As hard as he tried, Dave Schlotterbeck, CEO of Alaris Medical Systems, could not get his 2,900 employees to perform. The $500 million company had resulted from a merger of IVAC and Imed. While the merger should have produced strength, debt and under-performance stalled all efforts.

The breakthrough at Alaris was the result of focused effort. Through a series of cross-functional feedback sessions between operations, sales, quality, customer care and service, individuals were confronted with hard facts. People could see the problem and how they could change it. They overcame the barriers of functional expertise and prefer ences and aligned themselves for the common good. ALARIS attained a culture of accountability in which everyone wanted to do and achieve more.

Here are four steps to take in creating a culture of accountability

  1. Know what result you need to reach. Whether you have a sales goal, a delivery date for your product, or a minimum ROI to achieve, know what result you need to reach. Once you set the goat make it clear to all managers and employees. Everyone must know what they are working for and how their job moves the company forward.
  2. Generate joint accountability for results. This occurs when everyone assumes accountability for the result. No one can even think, let alone say, that he has done his job if the team has not achieved its targeted result. In fact, no one can think or say that she has achieved her individual result if the company has not achieved its result. Leaders can create joint accountability by targeting a clear result, driving the result though the company, and holding everyone accountable for achieving the result—not just doing his or her job. Joint accountability demands that everyone become accountable for producing the results the company must achieve.
  3. Keep people focused on achieving the result, not just putting in time and doing tasks. Often, job descriptions push people into boxes. They give people the idea that they are getting paid and using their skills to perform a defined function or task. The task mindset leads people to believe that if they perform their functions, they’ve done the job, whether or not the result is achieved. Effective leaders lead people beyond the boundaries of their jobs and inspire them to relentlessly pursue results by creating a culture that motivates them to ask, “What else can I do?” until the results are achieved. They help people see that their “job” is to achieve the results. The daily activities that comprise people’s jobs must be aligned with the targeted results.
  4. Direct you own destiny. Only when you assume full accountability for your thoughts, feelings, actions and results can you direct your own destiny; otherwise, someone else will. Accountability enables you to influence events and outcomes before they happen. You will gain much more from a proactive posture than from a reactive one.

This view of accountability can help revitalize your character, strengthen your competitiveness, heighten innovation, improve the quality of your products and services, and increase your responsiveness to the needs and wants of your customers and constituents. When you create a culture of accountability, you will achieve the results you want, and everyone will help you along the way.

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Posted in Business and Strategy Leaders and Innovators

How to Inspire People to Perform

How to Inspire People to Perform

What is the key to developing people? Coaching, behavioral modeling, defining clear pathways for development, making the performance improvement process more developmental and less judgmental, providing people with a model for their career development, and rewarding managers for people development.

Leaders who are effective at developing others tend also to be very engaged in their own self-development. So, ensure that your managers have a development plan themselves.

Imagine a manager who feels that she is at a dead end in her career. She has no sense of what she might do in the future. What career discussions will she have with her direct reports? She might say the right words, but inside she would say to herself, “Why should I give you career advice? If you get promoted, you will be at the same dead end. There is no future here.” Or she may think, “I have no future in this company, so why should I give you hope? They might make you my boss.”

Ensure that managers and leaders feel they have a clear career plan and developmental opportunities in their future.

Having trusting relationships is strongly associated with good teamwork. Most relationships depend on trust as a basis. Teams without trust suffer from conflicts and competition among members.

Leaders who are trusted share six characteristics:

  1. Consideration for others. A key to leveraging trust is having high concern for how your behavior affects others. Often, lack of consideration is evident when deadlines or problems occur. Balancing the need to get the job done with sensitivity for others’ needs and problems shows true consideration.
  2. An open, friendly style. Trust is made much easier when leaders are open and friendly rather than abrupt and dismissive. Those who are viewed as easy to get along with are also viewed as trustworthy. Leaders who work hard to win people over to their position rather than demand that people accept their position also build trust.
  3. Noncompetitive. As people go to college, they often feel they are in constant competition with others who could hurt their career. As new employees begin work, entry-level jobs provide the same context. Consulting firms hire hundreds of MBAs and weed out half within two years. Only one in ten makes it to partner. A key transition for leaders is viewing others as team members. Behaviors that kill trust include taking personal credit for the accomplishments of others or being threatened by the success of other team members. Leaders show support for other team members by backing them up when they make an honest mistake and accepting blame for failures of the group rather than criticizing the performance of individual team members.
  4. Inspire confidence in your abilities and knowledge. Expertise builds trusthaving confidence in a leader’s ability to achieve difficult goals. In addition to being friendly and considerate, being reliable and right is a critical aspect of building trust with others.
  5. Listen with care. There is a strong correlation between listening and trust. You rarely talk other people into trust. Listening to others in a way that shows them that you are interested in what they have to say builds trust.
  6. Speak with candor. Being frank honest in dealing with other people is critical to building trusting relationships. Telling people what they want to hear in an attempt to be nice or protect them from the truth only erodes trust in relationships. Sometimes information is confidential and cannot be shared with others. Leaders with candor can be straightforward about the fact that they cannot share specific information.
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Posted in Management and Leadership

Five Roles of a Leader

Five Roles of a Leader

As a leader, you must interact with your people everyday to inspire them to convert their vision into action, into reality. That reality depends on the versatility you display in the different roles you play. As a leader, you perform functions that require knowledge, attitudes, and skills ranging from creating a vision to raising funds to creating alliances, to developing your people, and transmitting information.

Can you be a manager and a leader the same time? Can you play different roles in the exercise of leadership? While designing a learning program develop leadership competences, we looked at the realities to which leaders are exposed and drafted a model, “The Hand of the Leader”, explain the five roles every leader must master. Let’s examine these five roles:

  1. Manager: As a manager, you seek and manage the necessary resources, coordinate actions, generate results, measure and control, report, ensure quality of processes, goods and services.
  2. Visionary: As a visionary, you create the vision, create the means to communicate it effectively, emotionally and rationally inspire your team members, and act as an agent of change.
  3. Coach: As a coach, you act as an athletic scout, seeking talent, developing successors, expanding potential through coaching-style interactions.
  4. Educator: As an educator, you transfer information, knowledge and experience through conferences, talks, workshops or instructive conversations develop team competencies and the intellectual capital of the organization.
  5. Ambassador: As an ambassador, you form strategic alliances for mutual support; plan effective strategies to develop media and inter-institutional relations; and promote the philosophy, history and services of your organization.

The myth that a manager cannot be leader appears to be fading as the roles of leaders are being assumed by individuals who may be highly skilled only in one of the five roles, but gain proficiency in the rest and achieve a balance needed to achieve critical objectives.

The “Hand of the Leader”, on which the thumb represents the manager, the index finger the visionary, the middle finger the coach, the ring finger the educator, and the little finger the ambassador, allows you to observe and analyze your performance and results in each role.

The Hidden Role

The “hidden role” is represented by the wrist, which gives flexibility and mobility to the hand and consequently to the fingers (roles).

This sixth role, like a sixth sense, is the role of learner. As a learner, you proactively seek to improve yourself, not only through information, but also through attitudes and abilities to become better at directing yourself and others.

You must learn to master these six roles to achieve positive results in terms of quality, effectiveness, productivity, profitability, and enjoyment.

Ask yourself: How good am I at each of these roles. What do I have to learn or change to be better in each role?

By using the “Hand of the Leader” as a guide, you can see how versatile and balanced you are as a leader, and you can improve your performance to better influence your people and impact your bottom line. We all need leaders who are aware of their own strengths, who improve themselves, and help their people and organizations succeed.

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Posted in Management and Leadership

Create Your Own Care Package

Create Your Own Care Package Think about what you’d do to renew yourself with just a snippet—or more—of time.

  • When you have five minutes … lay your head down, put your feet up, and give yourself a moment to think and dream.
  • With a half-hour … start a journal or give that yoga DVD a try.
  • During an afternoon … take yourself to a matinee or walk in the park.
  • Over a weekend … visit a friend you haven’t seen lately or hang out at a spa.

Whatever your ideal break, do it!

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