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The Way to Happiness

“Live a Day at a Time.”

Live a Day at a Time We have often heard this bit of wisdom, but it represents only a partial truth. Life has continuity and we cannot live from day to day, without planning ahead.” The future is being formed in the womb of the present, and unless we weigh today’s actions in terms of tomorrow’s consequences, we shall expose our lives to anarchy and improvisation. No significant result will ever reward our work, because any important enterprise requires time and planning for its proper conception and execution.

It is however true that for the enjoyment of life long stretches of time must be broken up into smaller units. From every day’s labor, we must extract some measure of joy. We cannot defer our happiness to some spectacular fulfillment lying far away in time.

Life is a journey towards a constantly receding goal. We may succeed in grasping that for which we have reached, but we soon discover that something else beckons to us from the far horizon. We never reach a point where we may say, “Now the race is run. I have found the heart’s desire.” They who wait for these spectacular moments of realization are doomed to unending frustration. In addition, as the span of life is limited, we dare not put off to a far-away hour the rewards, which we have a right to seek for our labors.

We must find life’s fulfillment day by day. Every day has its own destination. Every day has its own struggles and attainments. Every day has its opportunities to taste from the sweet wine of life—by creative endeavor in work and play, by giving and receiving love, by serving God and man, by seeking after goodness and truth. Taste the wine when the cup is near. Who knows what tomorrow may bring?

Today’s sunset will never again appear on the horizon. Today’s opportunities for happiness will be gone when the day is done, and they will be gone beyond recall. Plan for tomorrow but do not forget to reap the harvest of this day.

Spend Time with Your Loved Ones

As long as there is recognition, longing, or investment in someone else’s happiness, we are not experiencing categorical love. Generousness, discipline, patience, effort, and meditation are like the oars of the boat. Thus, the forms of all things are in the gist of the simple substance. But flat-out rejecting someone’s friendly relationship feels to most people too unmanageable despite the bitterness we may feel toward others for jabbing themselves upon us as well as toward ourselves for our unfitness to express to them how we really feel. To disdain someone romantically is hard enough. American Psychologist Lorne Ladner writes in his The Lost Art of Compassion,

If you say that family is important but somehow don’ find much quality time with yours each week; if you say that spirituality is important but spend only a few hours a week actively engaged in spiritual practice; if you say that helping others is important but you can’t think easily of recent examples of your doing so; then there’s probably a significant gap between the beliefs you hold consciously and the unconscious ones that are running your life.

Spend Time with Your Loved Ones However, to reject someone’s friendship seems to bear with it an unambiguously harsh judgment, calling into question, as it may seem to, their value as a person. You are not a human being until you value something more than the life of your body. In addition, the greater the things you live and die for the greater you are. The happiness of a man in this life does not comprise in the absence, but in the subordination, of his passions. Suffering also refers to physical pain and discomfort, and to emotions and mind states that prevent coexisting happiness and well-being. Thus, the forms that the cosmopolitan form unites exist in the form of the soul. Spend time with your loved ones in the fellowship of other people.

This discipline was designed to investigate the relationship between statistical and subjective weightings of judgments of teaching potency. Worry was negatively related to sense of humor. The conductor comes in. Voting is irrational because it is a victor takes all result. By the nature and plain inclination of a thing, it is more sensible to gauge of it, than to lay the whole stress on observations drawn from a supposed experience, which frequently is narrow-minded in its compass, and deceitful in its conclusions.

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Happy People Learn That Happiness, Like Sweat, is a by-product of Activeness

Happiness is a By-product of Activeness

Happiness is a by-product of Activeness “You forgot something, Joanna. You didn’t say “goodnight.” I heard this call ring out across the street one evening. I do not know Joanna, nor the little girl who thus reminded her friend of a lapse from thoughtfulness. The call to Joanna has somehow lingered in my mind, as a symbol of a general failing in modern man.

Joanna presumably enjoyed her friend’s hospitality. She had been with her for some time, they had played together; they had lived together. Friendship is a privilege, which Joanna was blessed with. Is it not proper to express a thankfulness for this privilege? How then could she leave her friend without saying a word, not even a goodnight?

Is not this thoughtlessness the problem of man generally? We take for granted the love of our parents, their care and devotion, the anxious hours spent by them in seeing us through all kinds of hardship. We take for granted the kindness of our friends and neighbors. We take from the poets and the artists, the scientists and the men of affairs the blessings their genius has brought into the world. We take all of it without pausing to think of how much we owe them.

Natural factors, which at one time were apathetic for the animas activities, can develop in a very short time into mighty stimuli for the most crucial life-sustaining functions. Happy people learn that happiness, like sweat, is a by-product of activeness. You can only achieve happiness if you are too busy living your life to notice whether you are happy or not.

What, if not a sense of gratitude, is the object of religion? It seeks to awaken in us an awareness of the greatest privilege of all—the privilege of the blessings we receive from God. Most of us also take His blessings without due thought. We breathe the calm, clear air; we watch the stars in their majestic cadences in the sky; we enjoy the fragrance of flowers and the laughter of children; we draw upon the energies of our hands and brains to perform our tasks; we dream and hope; and we create in the image of our dreams and hopes. However, we take all as our due, without a word of appreciation. This is why modern man cannot pray. Prayer is our expression of thanks to God for the privilege of living. Most modern people take all life for granted, and they do not bother to say “thank you”

Joanna was only thoughtless. However, thoughtlessness is one of the greatest failings of character. When you leave your friends, say “good-night” When you are the recipient of blessings, whether from God or man, learn to say “thank you”

Intangibles of Warm-heartedness and Consideration

Self-knowledge is a slippery business. You might think the nature of your center mission in life would lie within easy reach for ready viewing, and sometimes it does. But frequently it lies buried under a pile of expectations we have for ourselves interlacing with those others have for us that make our mission appear to us to be one thing when in reality it’s something else completely-sometimes something we don’t even want to admit, not just to others, but to ourselves.

Intangibles of Warm-heartedness and Consideration The intangibles of warm-heartedness and consideration are every bit important.

The China-U.S. relationship has perpetually had elements of friendly relationship and cooperation and rivalry. Human beings are born into this short span of life of which the best thing is its friendships and intimacies … and yet they leave behind their friendships and intimacies with no cultivation, to grow, as they will by the wayside, expecting them to “keep” by pressure of mere inertia. American Psychologist Lorne Ladner writes in his The Lost Art of Compassion,

If we spend time dwelling on our desire, we gradually concrete a world driven by greed, advertising and compulsive consumerism. When we dwell in anger and fear, we concrete a world filled with weapons, conflicts and wars. To the extent that we dwell in love and compassion, we concrete a world characterized by peace, mercy, safety and inspiring beauty.

When we let go of our concepts of duality and separation, then love, which is connection, and compassion, which is kindness, arise as reflections of the mind’s natural state. Like all works that strike the imagination, it pleased while new; but, wanting the foundation of reason, the whole fabric has long since fallen to the ground.

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Mighty in Deeds and Not in Words

The Wisdom of Deeds Will Be Necessary for the World to Come

Wisdom of Deeds Will Be Necessary The man sweeping the synagogue paused for a moment. He looked at die flowers lying about in disorder. “What waste!” he said to himself. Those roses had adorned the pulpit at a wedding an hour before. Now all was over and they were waiting to be discarded.

The attendant leaning on his sweeper was lost in thought when suddenly he heard a strange sound. One of the roses replied to him.

“Do you call this a waste?” the flower protested. “What is life anyway, yours or mine, but a means of service? My mission was to create some fragrance and beauty, and when I have fulfilled it, my life has not been wasted. And what greater privilege is there than to adorn a bride’s way to her beloved, what greater privilege than to help glorify the moment when a bride and groom seal their faith in each other by entering the covenant of marriage?”

Our listed flower paused for a moment to watch the man’s face, and then continued her discourse.

Roses are like people. They live in deeds, not in time.

My glory was but for a brief hour, but you should have seen the joy in the bride’s eye, “I like to believe that I had something to do with it, by creating a suitable setting for the moment of her supreme happiness. So do not grieve for me. My life has been worthwhile”

Having spoken her little piece, the rose was once more silent. The attendant, startled from his reverie and a little wiser, pushed the sweeper again and continued with his work.

If only the people who agonize about their financial obligation would think about the riches they do possess, they would stop troubling. Would you sell both your eyes for a one hundred thousand dollars … or your two legs … or your hands … or your hearing? Add up what you do have, and you will find that you will not sell them for all the gold in the planet. The best things in life are yours, if you can acknowledge the economic value of yourself.

Be Not Careless in Deeds

Be Not Careless in Deeds In all cases and constitutions, in all habits of body, at every point of life, and under possibly every circumstance, cool air, drinking cold water bountifully, and bathing the whole body, or at least the private parts with tepid or icy cold water, agrees absolutely well, and produces the happiest and most providential effects. Therefore, it is strongly connected with a detestation of oppression of every kind; and forms a taste for liberty and laws.

The great majority of psychiatrists not only hold that dementia consists in the constipation of such encompassing mental powers as memory, judgment, conception, etc., but also believe—in company with most psychologists—that an average mental test measures one of these powers. The Lebanese-American scholar, statistician, and essayist Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes in Antifragile,

While in the past people of rank or status were those and only those who took risks, who had the downside for their actions, and heroes were those who did so for the sake of others, today the exact reverse is taking place. We are witnessing the rise of a new class of inverse heroes, that is, bureaucrats, bankers, Davos-attending members of the I.A.N.D. (International Association of Name Droppers), and academics with too much power and no real downside and/or accountability. They game the system while citizens pay the price.

At no point in history have so many non-risk-takers, that is, those with no personal exposure, exerted so much control.

The chief ethical rule is the following: Thou shalt not have antifragility at the expense of the fragility of others.

In all matters of opinion and science, the case it diametrical: The divergence among men is there oftener found to lie in generals than in particulars; and to be less in reality than in appearance. The reliable harvest of my daily life is as impalpable and untellable as the tints of morning or evening. It is a little stardust caught a section of the rainbow, which I have clutched. If the flash should reach so low as the earth, and a person should regrettably be in the place of its detonation, he is broadly struck dead in a moment, and feels the most instant of all kinds of death. Mighty in deeds and not in words.

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The Significance of Weeds in the Garden

Why God Made Weeds

Why God Made Weeds A farmer once sighed after he had finished weeding his garden. His back was bent; the perspiration ran down his face. “If not for those cursed weeds,” he said to himself, “gardening would be such a joy. Why God made weeds is really beyond me.”

The farmer mused a little as he contemplated the heap of weeds he had pulled out. Suddenly one of the weeds spoke up. Its face was already pale and wilting, but it mustered enough strength to speak in self-defense.

“You should not speak ill of any of God’s creatures,” the little weed said. “You have given us a bad name and decried our presence in the world. We render you a thousand uses you may not be aware of. We tend your soil when you are not there to cultivate it. We prevent your precious earth from being washed away by the rain. We do not allow it to be carried away by the wind as dust. Moreover, do we not justify our existence even in your carefully cultivated garden? Your flowers would never be able to stand the elements, to survive the blowing winds and lashing rains, if we did not toughen them. In their skirmishes with us, they gain strength. When you enjoy their spectacle, remember that we had a part in their growth.

If a great part of humanity had their eyes thus tinctured, each would see objects different from his fellow, yet none would be sensitive of the mistake.

If even those weak forms of religion, mixed with so much wrongdoing, were significant to society; how much more, that reasonable and true worship of God which the gospel teaches? True religious belief introduces the idea of regular subjugation, by accustoming humankind to the awe of super ordinate power, in the divinity, joined with the esteem of superior wisdom and goodness.

The weed made a marked impression, and then although almost exhausted it continued in a peroration, “The vegetation you cultivate is like the people in your own world. They need some opposition to be toughened for the formidable business of living.”

The weed resumed its silence. The farmer straightened his back as he wiped his brow. A smile of satisfaction came over his face. He looked out on the field that was yet to be weeded, but he knew that weeding would no longer be a disagreeable task. They are fixed in a frame, which can interpolate their focal distance at pleasure, so that the same machine, which throws the combined reflected rays to a distance of two hundred feet, may, by the turn of a handle, be made to throw their united force upon an object not distant above twenty.

We Value Medicine for the Role Can Play in Promoting a Return to Health

Promoting a Return to Health The level to which a signal would alter the lives of our descendants depends on whether we could decipher any attached message. The assortment of sounds is innumerous; but because the ear cannot compare two sounds so as promptly to differentiate their discriminations when they exceed the proportionality of one and seven, musicians have been contented to confine all concordance within that compass, and allowed but seven notes in musical composition. Mark Rowlands The Philosopher and the Wolf: Lessons from the Wild on Love, Death and Happiness

According to many philosophers, happiness is intrinsically valuable. What they mean is that happiness is valuable for its own sake, not for the sake of anything else. Most of the things we value, we do so because of other things they can do for us. We value money, for example, only because of other things we can purchase with it: food, shelter, security, perhaps, some of us thing, even happiness. We value medicine not in itself but because of the role it can play in promoting a return to health. Money and medicine are instrumentally valuable, but they are not intrinsically valuable.

The honor and glory of the average man is that he is capable of following that enterprisingness; that he can respond internally to wise and noble things, and be led to them with his eyes open. He went from being a demanding boss to a very verbally opprobrious boss to a boss who would come in and throw things at you. In such moments, and in many early moments likewise, he reminds one of the approbatory spirits of Ronald Reagan and, like Reagan, reminds his listeners of the better angels of their nature. Various bitter wars were fought over the issue and the country changed hands a number of times, until 198 B.C.E., when by a decisive feat of arms, the Seleucid king added her to his kingdom.

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We Are What We Repeatedly Do

We Are What We Repeatedly Do

How do we come to be strong as people? How do we come to be brave, patient or persistent? Are we born that way?

Sayings such as “Practice makes perfect” exemplify the well-known fact that repetition improves learning. This was discussed by abundant ancient and medieval philosophers and was demonstrated empirically by Hermann Ebbinghaus, the first academic to carry out a protracted series of experiments on human memory. In a classic 1885 book, Ebbinghaus showed that retaining of information improves as a function of the number of times the information has been studied. Since the time of Ebbinghaus, innumerable investigators have used repetition to examine learning and memory.

Without any knowledge of how the brain works, about 2,500 years ago Greek philosopher-scientist Aristotle pretty much nailed it by using common sense to explain what he observed in human behavior:

Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.

It may sound a lot like the truism, “Practice makes perfect,” but Aristotle is accurate that being who we are comes from repetition of performance to form behavior patterns.

These days, neuroscientists explain that behavior patterns happen when the brain cells concerned in the behavior become physically connected to each other in a network called a neural pathway. We aren’t born with this efficient hard-wiring. More exactly, the separate brain cells involved in the behavior are stimulated by usage to grow tiny filaments called dendrites. By reiterating the behavior over and over, the dendrites ultimately connect the cells with each other into a network called a neural pathway. At this stage the behavior pattern is said to be entrenched, meaning the mental processing is so efficient it feels effortless and automatic. Indeed, the behavior may be implemented even without conscious thought.

We use words like skills, habits and personal strengths to describe these behavior patterns. We can learn bad habits as well as good habits—any kind of behavior pattern at all. All it takes is replication over time. We can develop addictions as well as character strengths. As Aristotle said it so well so long ago, “We are what we repeatedly do.”

Thus, repetition need not lead to enhanced learning. Rather, repetition leads to increased opportunities for learning to occur. Whether learning takes place will depend on the type of information that has to be recollected and the amount and nature of dispensation that a person carries out.

Because the brain cell connections are physical, the patterns they enable are hard-wired…and everlasting. So if you want to break a bad habit, your challenge is to grow a new substitute neural pathway. You don’t actually get rid of old, undesirable behavior patterns. You learn new ones that give you more satisfaction, which means you’ll use them more and the old ones less.

The good news is that once you learn how to swim or ride a bicycle, the skill will stay with you for the rest of your life, even without using the ability for years.

More good news for people practicing a learning journey: You can grow stronger by simply doing the right things constantly over time. The behavior may seem awkward and clumsy at first, but it becomes easier the more you do it.

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Boredom is a Sickness of the Soul

The Only Unhappiness is a Life of Boredom

The Only Unhappiness is a Life of Boredom Have you ever been bored? When we have nothing in particular to do, and have time on our hands, a strange unrest seizes us, and we feel our life to be futile and meaningless.

Nearly all unhappiness in life comes from the inclination to blame someone else. Let us always hope well of a cause that is good in itself, and beneficial to human race. The pathology of the case up until now remains concealed in darkness. At that profundity the bottom, which had no pressure of water above it, and had a substantial pressure below, would not sink nor fall from the tube, but in reality swam at that depth upon the water? There is no one rationality why all these states got into trouble. Much is already being done, but more is needed. It is called the sewer serene, a disquiet in which the eye is, to all appearance, as capable of seeing as in the profound state; but, notwithstanding, the individual remains for life in gross darkness.

Boredom is not an uncommon human experience. It is a divine judgment against our uncreative life. The Lord placed us in this world for a purpose. We have tasks waiting to be done. In us, there is the energy of hand and heart and mind, craving for release, for action. Yet we allow the tasks to remain undone, and our energies to be untapped. Our feeling of boredom is an indication of God’s displeasure with what we are making of ourselves. This unrest of the soul calls for no special cure except work, work that will serve someone in the world, work that will give us the most priceless of all joys—the satisfaction of being useful, of being creative.

God has woven many safeguards, for our own wellbeing, into the fabric of our natures. In the face of peril, we are pervaded by an emotion of fear. When our bodies need sustenance, we feel a sensation of hunger. Because the Lord wanted us to live with mates in the family of life, He gave us the sexual urge. These pressures in our nature are the controls the Lord has set upon us to steer us die way He wishes us to go. Boredom is just such a control.

The Lord did not want us to stagnate through idleness. We each have a job we can do, and should do. It may be a rigorous job, and initially it may appear hard, even beyond us. Nevertheless, let us put our hand and heart to it, and if we suffer from any feeling of boredom, it will fade before we know it, as morning mist fades at the oncoming sun.

Boredom is One of the Greatest Tortures of Life

Boredom is One of the Greatest Tortures of Life Humans defend their territory covetously—trapping, snaring, poisoning, shooting offhanded, and putting the dogs on the contention. The Japanese have a term, kenzoku, which translated literally means ‘family.’ The connotation suggests a bond between people who have made an interchangeable commitment and who possibly therefore share a similar fate. It implies the presence of the deep connection of friendship, of lives lived as comrades from the distant past. The air upon the Italian desolate coast, still open and dry the soil, is incessantly found grievous; while universally through Europe the most thickly settled cities are reckoned the most healthful.

Normally, people believe that defeat is characterized by a general bustle and a vehement rush. Bustle and rush are the signs of victory, not of defeat. Victory is a thing of action. Every participant in victory sweats and puffs, carrying the stones for the building of the house. But defeat is a thing of tiredness, of incoherence, of boredom. Above all of futility. Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari wrote in his best selling Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind,

Nobody would doubt that all the new technologies will enhance again the collective power of humankind, but the question we should be asking ourselves is what’s happening on the individual level. We have enough evidence from history that you can have a very big step forward, in terms of collective power, coupled with a step backwards in terms of individual happiness, individual suffering. We need to ask ourselves about the new technologies emerging at present, not only how are they going to impact the collective power of humankind, but also how are they going to impact the daily life of individuals.

This gives rise to a tremendous stirring, one based not on hope but on experience. When the Dutch, smith bole, cut down the clove trees of the island of ternate, of which it was full, in order to raise the cost of cloves in Europe, this produced such a shift in the air, that the island from being exceedingly salubrious, became sickly and unhealthy to an uttermost degree. At least you would ultimately know how mystifying the hole is. Yet what is inside is the only origin of happiness.

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Generousness Brings Enjoyment, and Discipline Happiness

The Prose of Everyday Life

Young couples occasionally look back with nostalgia on the romantic beginnings of their love. The bonds, which now link them to each other, are real and deep, yet they remember the earlier exhilaration, when each encounter was an adventure, long anticipated, and long remembered. They sometimes feel as though all the sparkle, all the poetry has gone out of their lives.

The Prose of Everyday Life Their complaint is in some sense true, but they do not fully understand the meaning of the change, which has taken place in their lives. The excitation was a necessary stimulant to courtship. It was necessary to overcome the resistance to the loss of independence, which is in some respects inevitable when two lives are to be merged into one. A tree, in the early stages of its transplantation needs special nurture, and so do young people at the time of the most radical change in their lives.

That stimulant recedes when it has accomplished its purpose. Indeed its persistence might become a hindrance, since some young people whose pursuit of each other has ended with the prize won; now have other things to do. They must begin the prose of everyday life. They must begin to share the rigors of living, to face common tasks, to help each other in their climb towards the new horizons opening in their life together.

The thin kindling wood gives off a brilliant flame, but that flame cannot last, and does not give out warmth. Its function is to ignite the heavy log, which will burn with less sparkle, less glitter, but with the most glowing steadiness. The fire of later years is not as brilliant as the blaze, which burned at the beginning, but it is firmer, surer, and warmer.

It was made of clay, effortlessly chipped, and coarsely painted. The universal arrangement is the time-honored one of a thoughtfulness of the anatomy of the cerebellum from a descriptive point of view, followed by a segment on experimentation, with, in the end, a detailed account of the diagnostic of affections of this portion of the brain, and a discourse of the relation of the brain to motility.

Happiness is Simple-minded Than Suffering

Happiness is Simple-minded Than Suffering Let us not permit the kindling wood to flare up and burn itself out in a beautiful but brief exhibit of flame, without being sure it ignites the thicker log for the more enduring fire.

Would not this require vast strength to effect? Pretty standardized is the force that the muscles of the arm exert in raising the whole length of the arm, and the weight of the hand beside. Our lives are not determined by what happens to us but by how we react to what happens, not by what life brings to us, but by the mindset, we bring to life. An affirmative mental attitude causes a chain reaction of positive thoughts, events, and outcomes. It is a medium, a spark that creates extraordinary results. Our reputation is an instrument, then-not, hopefully, for creating or maintaining our self-esteem but for pragmatic pilot age through daily life, a good one smoothing out the travel somewhat, a bad one causing doors to slam in our face and testing our self-confidence in ourselves. German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche writes in Mastery,

Do not talk about giftedness, inborn talents! One can name great men of all kinds who were very little gifted. They acquired greatness, became ‘geniuses’ (as we put it), through qualities the lack of which no one who knew what they were would boast of: they all possessed that seriousness of the efficient workman which first learns to construct the parts properly before it ventures to fashion a great whole; they allowed themselves time for it, because they took more pleasure in making the little, secondary things well than in the effect of a dazzling whole.

Given these and other benefits, I can think of very few grounds entrepreneurs would skip physical exercise to work on their business. The research says that exercise is working on their business. This is why happiness is simple-minded than suffering, which is incessantly working so hard. The unicorn of happiness is allergic to advice and Little Me’s elaborate schemes are not interesting to her. She is a free roamer with no fixed terminus or shape; her hooves are in the Tao.

Nonetheless, when the lights diffuse to the corporeal matter, then the light becomes seeable and is revealed to the senses because of the heaviness of the corporeal matter. Many people find this to be one of the most difficult aspects of the mindfulness practice. They were all grateful that he was the one who was hit by the bus and not them.

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A Life Frittered Away by Detail

'Walden' by Henry David Thoreau (ISBN 1505297729) From Henry David Thoreau’s Walden,

Our life is frittered away by detail. An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest. Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity! I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumb-nail. In the midst of this chopping sea of civilized life, such are the clouds and storms and quicksands and thousand-and-one items to be allowed for, that a man has to live, if he would not founder and go to the bottom and not make his port at all, by dead reckoning, and he must be a great calculator indeed who succeeds. Simplify, simplify.

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Your Life is Not Your Own

The Heart and Benevolence That is God

Your Life Is Not Your Own “It is my life. I can do with it as I please.” How often have you heard that defiant declaration of independence? Yet, it is based on no more than a half-truth. Nevertheless, if this were the case the ill results of neediness from sleep would tend to accumulate and hence become more evident after such deprivation had consumed for a number of years.

It is true that every man has a duty, not to speak of a right, to live by his own lights. No man was meant to be a duplicate of another, or echo someone else’s voice. The Creator made each of us a distinctive person, with a mind of his own. Presumably, He wanted us to live by it, to justify making us what we are. Yet, our life is not entirely our own, and we do not have an unqualified right to do what we please. Our parents, our friends, our society too, have all made investments in us, and what we do makes a difference to them! We are obliged to consider whether we are conserving or dissipating their investments.

The greatest investor in our lives is God, Who conferred existence upon us, and who endowed us with potentialities waiting to be awakened by us to active life. The Creator’s work is never without a purpose, so there is then a goal, a commitment to which our lives are charged. A man may refuse to pay his bills, but a record exists. A charge is entered against every name and we are all in duty bound to redeem our outstanding obligations.

It strengthens your purpose to stick with your resolve not to do harm again. As if, happiness is somewhat reciprocally, symmetrical to desire. It has been suggested that only such tests should be used which all-normal persons without exclusion can fulfill (Zhen). American Psychologist Lorne Ladner writes in his The Lost Art of Compassion,

We all naturally want to be happy. However, …. when we approach life in a self-centred way, focusing primarily on our own protection, security, possessions and well-being, happiness always eludes us. Seeking happiness in this way unintentionally but inevitably leads to insecurity loneliness, neediness and misery. By contrast, when our approach to life is base on love, empathy and compassion for others, happiness flows to us in an ever-increasing stream. ….

Many people agree that compassion, like … charity, is a good thing. However, people are so in the habit of seeking happiness outside themselves that it’s extremely rare for anyone to even consider taking this idea literally—which is how it’s intended—and experiment with cultivating compassion as the main path to happiness in their lives.

Inspiration Comes Only from Reverence Toward the Achievements of God

Reverence Toward the Achievements of God Would not this involve immense strength to effect? Similar is the force that the muscles of the arm wield in raising the whole length of the arm, and the weight of the hand beside. To fortify their case, they also sought through all uncommitted project documents and data files, many of which recognize from the days when computers relied on punch cards for data entry and stored data on nine-track tape.

If everyone else around us is consuming material things and giving in to craving, it is more hard to maintain our mindful awareness. In less than a century, it had entirely lost those traces left by the shoes of George Washington. Trying to cut a three-iron around a tree, he alternatively deinked its trunk, the ball rolling back at him, scoffing.

Manifestly, imagining the pleasure they would feel from humoring in an unavailable enticement distracted the children even more than cognitively restructuring the way they thought about the enticement before them.

The ability of newborns to imbibe everything around them straightaway dictates the intention of a particular environment for them in the hospitals. My intuition is that self-knowledge and experience play a theatrical role in reconciling happiness vs. meaning, short-term versus long-term.

“My life is not my own.” It is a trust for which I am responsible. I have no right to do with it as I please, but I am under an obligation to discharge the terms of the trust.

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Do the Best You Can and Don’t Take Life Too Serious

Do the Best You Can and Don’t Take Life Too Serious

The Wisdom of Living

The Wisdom of Living The finger on the dock of time turns inexorably. We are sometimes saddened when we realize that time moves on, that the years are slipping out of our hands, yet these thoughts need not really depress us. Evils in the journey of life are like the hills which alarm travelers on the road.

The wisdom of living consists in making the most of what we are given. We cannot weave without threads, but it is our skill with the threads that determines whether we shall fashion a beautiful tapestry or labor without producing anything of use or beauty.

God does not fashion life for us. He does not determine the shape of our dreams, or our accomplishments, but He gives us the threads… He has endowed our hands with energy, our minds with power to reason, our hearts with the power to feel, and He placed us upon the scene of nature abounding in the raw materials with which we can build to our heart’s desire. Both appear great at a distance, but when we approach them we find they are far less insurmountable than we had conceived. Both of these, when their nature is examined, are equal.

Cultivating Gratitude Makes Each Day Worth Living

Only a fortunate few experience unadulterated synchronicity of such allegiance. Given this four ways gratitude can profit us, we have some very good reasons to return thanks more than once a year. Cultivating gratitude makes each day worth living and might even give us more days. Although some students take more than four years to discharge their degrees, most juniors and seniors are comparatively young compared with students in urban communities where working masses take part-time loads and evening classes.

An artist who has spent his days fashioning a thing of beauty rejoices in his labor when it is done. He does not fret that the days, which have passed, have made him older. Only empty days, futile days, wasted days, are a tragedy. Only the passing of days such as these is depressing. Alan Garner wrote in The Voice That Thunders,

The purpose of the storyteller is to relate the truth in a manner that is simple: to integrate without reduction; for it is rarely possible to declare the truth as it is, because the universe presents itself as a Mystery. We have to find parables; we have to tell stories to unriddle the world … The job of a storyteller is to speak the truth; but what we feel most deeply cannot be spoken in words. At this level only images connect. And so the story becomes symbol; and symbol is myth

Develop interest in life as you see it; in people, things, literature, music—the cosmos is so rich, simply throbbing with bountiful treasures, beautiful souls and interesting citizenry. The only well-founded ground of judgment of conviction would be that with the personal tastes and self-regarding concerns of individuals the public has no business to interpose.

Life Wastes Itself While We are Preparing to Live

Life Wastes Itself While We are Preparing to Live How are we using the threads that the Lord has given us? At the New Year, we ask this question. It is a disturbing question, because on its answer depends the sum of meaning in our lives. Investing a fixed sum of money at regular intervals prevents you from buying too many shares when stock prices are over-inflated, as many market seers consider them to be right now, thereby threatening your average cost per share and increasing your return. The latter tells of a German who showed various feats of this kind at Greater London, and who performed before the king and a part of the imperial family. Anyone who is perfectly certain about a belief is likely to be wrong.

Wasted threads, badly used threads, show up in the final design, but when we weave with skill, and fashion life into a pattern of harmony and goodness, and then our existence becomes permeated with serenity and peace. We can laugh though die days pass and the years go, for then we have given only time in exchange for achievement.

During this season of the year, we often recall the Psalmist’s prayer, “O teach us to count our days that we may get us a heart of Wisdom.” No, it does not really mean to count days. Anyone can do that. It is rather a prayer to make the days count. That is indeed the supreme wisdom of living.

In short, a great and brilliant plan of Almighty administration is in part opened; and nothing is omitted that may give humanity the mystifying sense of their being all the subjects of the moral regime of God. The company of concordant friends will be the best medicine in an evening; and good broth his primed supper. The risk of taking one or a handful of circumscribed experiences and generalizing them across our aggregate life.

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