Conscious Leaders Honor the Trust Placed in Them

Conscious Leadership

The world have witnessed huge lapses in leadership, as many leaders have either betrayed our trust by doing something unethical or self-serving or failed to do anything positive, allowing unwanted conditions to persist. While these events say something about the quality of the people in positions of power and influence, they may say even more about those of us who add legitimacy to their positions by our acceptance, trust, and belief.

Are we getting what we deserve? What makes real leaders who are fit for the times? How do we distinguish between authentic leaders who are worthy of our trust from the bogus leaders who disappoint and damage us?

Good management is based on good mechanics—like procedures, technique, models, and policies. Good leadership requires more creativity, articulating and bringing forth a vision. It calls for solid intuition, instinct, and a good “feel” for what is needed.

Leadership that originates inside is of higher quality than the leadership that comes from outside. Leadership and conscious leadership are not the same thing. To learn the latter, leaders must exercise their moral compass. Organizational theorists call this inner-directed style “conscious leadership,” since it isn’t so concerned with conforming to some model, code, or form but is grounded in the “energy field” of everyone involved—the group consciousness.

Conscious leaders know what is right and proper (or they ask if they are not sure). Their “knowing” comes from their internal moral compass. Their leadership emerges from their sense of self, not from policy, procedures, techniques, and systems.

Bogus Leadership

Bogus leadership is often the result of following some blueprint, script, election procedure, or career path without making any serious mistakes. Usually bogus leaders have good intentions. They do the best they can within the limits of their thinking and conditioning, what they know and whom they think they are. However, poor leadership is often the result of unconscious behavior—acts and attitudes rooted in familiarity, insecurity fear, immaturity, mimicry, disappointment, hurt, and other factors that cause people to create public personas and images. When we engage the world from image, we get the menu, not the meal. Bogus leaders protect what they have been in the past. Real leaders focus on what they are becoming in the future.

Managers who are asked to step into leadership roles often apply what they learned as managers to their new responsibilities. By adapting their old skill sets to their new roles, they operate from structure or form rather than from who they are. Those who inherit their positions through nepotism or planned succession can also fall into this trap.

Bogus leadership is image-based, so the trappings make it appear that a person is a bona fide leader.

Conscious leaders possess confidence in which they are as people, along with an abiding trust that they are up for whatever situations come their way. Conscious leaders distinguish themselves by doing that which is untimely, out of favor, and even provisionally unprofitable in the service of long-term health and value.

Bogus Leadership Bogus leaders need to consult with their image before taking action. They need to check regulations, codes of ethics, advisors, polls, and focus groups. When people confuse their image with which they are, their image must be preserved by all means, as a matter of survival.

Conscious leaders are loyal to the proper course of action. They certainly seek advice and gather all the facts they need, but their choices need not pass through the filters of image. When we observe these people in action, we may think they are “natural born leaders,” since their abilities and choices are so innately appropriate. They do not rely on force to get what they need. Having dominion over themselves, they feel no need to dominate others. They inspire rather than intimidate people. They have mastery without having to manipulate people or circumstances.

Conscious leaders are always growing and learning. Their only limits are self-imposed. True leaders inspire us. They are masters of their craft. They come across as real and human. They possess a magic that does not rely on charisma alone but is grounded in absolute grace. These people shine in times of difficulty.

Why do we tolerate, condone, and empower bogus leaders? Why do we allow them to gain positions of influence? Why do we give them legitimacy? Are we so image-conscious that we cannot tell the difference between an actor and a real leader? Are we so lazy or apathetic that we allow anyone who sounds good and looks the part to speak for us and make decisions that affect us?

Have we abdicated our responsibility by turning our backs on meaning and purpose in our lives, becoming desensitized to mediocrity, dysfunction, addictions, and incivility? If we tolerate, condone, and empower bogus leaders, we deserve what we get—mediocre government degenerating values, unethical and greedy leaders, hypocritical priests, dysfunctional teams, bureaucratic gridlock, and spiritual bankruptcy. We add legitimacy to their reigns by our passive tolerance and failure to eject them.

When you are trusted, you have a sacred responsibility to represent those people you are serving. The more people counting on you and entrusting their futures to you, the more responsibility you have to honor that trust and serve the interests of your constituency.

When we abandon our reliance on image, we find new levels of self-confidence and self-trust. Bogus leaders need to dump their image, tear up their scripts, and get real with whom they are and whom they are serving.

Have we abdicated our responsibility by turning our backs on meaning and purpose in our lives, becoming desensitized to mediocrity, dysfunction, addictions, and incivility? If we tolerate, condone, and empower bogus leaders, we deserve what we get—mediocre government degenerating values, unethical and greedy leaders, hypocritical priests, dysfunctional teams, bureaucratic gridlock, and spiritual bankruptcy. We add legitimacy to their reigns by our passive tolerance and failure to eject them.

How to Develop Conscious Leadership

  • Clarity over expectations, a leadership vision, execution, and delivering on the expectations of the stakeholders is the foundation for a successful, conscious leader.
  • Conscious leaders make it clear that they actually welcome and are comfortable with nonconforming viewpoints. Their actions reinforce their words. They ensure that the person who are challenging them are listened to, even if such communication is uncomfortable or personally challenging to receive.
  • Conscious leaders understand that, when they are trusted, they have a sacred responsibility to represent those people they are serving. The more people counting on the leaders and entrusting their futures to the leaders, the more responsibility these leaders have to honor that trust and serve the interests of their constituencies.

When we abandon our reliance on image, we find new levels of self-confidence and self-trust. Bogus leaders need to dump their image, tear up their scripts, and get real with whom they are and whom they are serving.

Conscious leaders can be developed by deepening their principles, their sense of purpose, expanding their capability to navigate difficult and complex circumstances, and enriching their emotional resilience. Given the right conditions, virtually anyone can develop capacity to lead consciously. It is important that individuals intending to exercise conscious leadership build and nurture organizations with a broader aim without risking being engrossed in short-term goals that dominate many profit-driven businesses.

Conscious leadership, in the end, is not something we do. It is something we become.

Tagged
Posted in Management and Leadership

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>