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Hasidic Judaism Quotes

Hasidic Judaism is a Jewish religious sect Hasidic Judaism or Hasidism is a Jewish religious sect that resulted from a spiritual revival movement in Western Ukraine during the 18th century and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe.

  • Rabbi Michel of Zlotchov once said to his children, “My life was always blessed in that I never needed anything until I had it.”
  • Rabbi Rami Shapiro writes: “Aren’t all religions equally true? No, all religions are equally false. The relationship of religion to truth is like that of a menu to a meal. The menu describes the meal as best it can. It points to something beyond itself. As long as we use the menu as a guide we do it honor. When we mistake the menu for the meal, we do it and ourselves a grave injustice.”
  • Soon after the death of Rabbi Moshe of Kobrin someone asked one of his disciples what was the most important thing to his teacher. The disciple thought and then replied, “Whatever he happened to be doing at the moment.”
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Use the Theory of Constraints to Create a Viable Vision

Any complex system is based on inherent simplicity

Strategic Vision is Viable

Viable vision is the opportunity of a company to have, within four years, annual net profit equal to its current total sales. Any complex system is based on intrinsic simplicity. Capitalizing on the inherent simplicity empowers incredible improvements within a short time. The more data needed to designate fully a system, the more complex it is. Enumerating reductions in total systems costs that are often heart to the customer company is also difficult. Most companies, even small ones, are complex and accordingly challenging to manage. The few elements commanding the performance of the system are the restrictions or advantage points —the Theory of Constraints.

When I scrutinize a company, I am rather fulfilled only when I clearly see how it is possible to bring the company to have, within four years, annual net profit equal to its current total sales. That is what I mean by a “viable vision.” In emergent markets such as China and India, clients want decent quality products that are simple to install, use, and maintain.

I am careful when sharing this anticipation with the top management; I expose the reasons why I believe this vision is viable. I share my analysis of what is obstructive performance. Using logic, I deduce the steps that will eradicate that block. Then I detail the steps to take to capitalize on that breakthrough. In this way, the reaction of top managers is, “This is common sense. Why aren’t we doing it?”

Capitalizing on Strategic Simplicity

Any complex system is based on inherent simplicity. Capitalizing on the inherent simplicity enables implausible improvements within a short time.

The more data needed to describe fully a system, the more complex it is. These infringements come at a significant cost to the organization, since too much time spent on day-to-day details can endanger future growth.

How complex is the system you manage? How many pages are needed to describe every process and the relationships with each client? Most companies, even small ones, are complex and thus tough to manage.

We manage a complex system by dissecting it into subsystems that are less complex. However, this can lead to miss-synchronization, harmful local optima, and the silo mentality. Since our systems are compound, we might think that all we can do is to improve synchronization and nurture collaboration between the subsystems. Public corporations are required to maximize their return to shareholders—not to customers. If this is the only option we contemplate, we will believe that achieving a major jump in profit within a short time is a rarity. We will think that creating net profit equal to current total sales in less than four years is unrealistic.

Leaders of successful innovation exertions are gifted visionaries. To see the potential of a company, we need to realize that the thing that makes our system difficult to manage is that what is done in one place has complications in other places; the cause-and-effect relationships turn our system into a maze. Strategically central issues and opportunities can occur at any time, and they cannot always wait for the next planning cycle or off-site to roll around. However, that fact also provides the key to the solution. This model had served them well. However, they began conjecturing about their organization in the future. They began to wonder if the model would work when the commodity that was being passed around was information, not metal.

Examine a system and ask, what is the minimum number of points we must impact to impact the whole system? If the answer is “10 points,” this is a challenging system to manage because it has too many degrees of freedom. However, if the answer is “one point,” this system is easy to manage.

Theory of Strategic Constraints - Strategic Wisdom

Now, the more interdependence between the components of the system, the fewer degrees of freedom the system has. However, the realities and the consequences of how they actually use their time are often quite different. Bearing in mind the complexity of your system, only a few elements govern the entire system. The more composite the system, the more profound is its essential simplicity.

To capitalize on the inherent simplicity, we must identify those few elements that govern the system. In addition, if we clarify the cause-and-effect relationships among all elements of the system, we can manage the system to achieve higher performance.

Companies turn out to be too focused on executing today’s business model and stop thinking about the fact that business models are perishable. Because companies’ decision-making systems are designed to push investments to initiatives that offer the most perceptible and immediate returns, companies shortchange investments in initiatives that are imperative to their long-term strategies.

Theory of Strategic Constraints

The few elements dictating the performance of the system are the constraints or advantage points-the Theory of Constraints (TOC).

In this school of management, we are qualified never to bring forward problems without a recommended solution. The marketing and strategy of companies is in it’s not luck. They have to be streetwise but not necessarily wise in other ways. They need to be fledgling and without much need for sleep. If you read these books, you will agree that the conclusions are horse sense, even though they fly in the face of common practice. Moreover, if you put it into practice, you experience remarkable improvements in a short time.

Is a viable vision possible for your company? Is it feasible to have, within four years, yearly net profit equal to its current yearly sales? The complications are discouraging. For example, such profitability is impossible without a huge increase in sales, and this is doable only if you have a remarkable new offer accepted by your markets. Can such an offer exist? Can you produce on such an offer? What investments will be needed? In addition, is your team capable of implementing such a change?

You do not have to coin your own phrase, but if you can find a simple, clear concept at the core of your policy, and if you can get others to appreciate it, then you are on your way to forming nuggets of you of strategic wisdom. A winning, stupendous concept will keep a team positively focused and sustain it during the inescapable disappointments and trying times.

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Why You Need a Mentor & How to Make the Most of a Mentorship Experience

Mentorship Experience: Bill Gates and Warren Buffett A mentor can be an important catalyst for career development. It’s important, therefore, to take the initiative and seek a mentor, either within or outside one’s workplace. Mentoring refers to a developmental relationship between two people where the more experienced person, or the mentor, acts as a teacher, coach and guide to the mentee, who is seeking to move ahead in education, career or life in general. Let’s take a look at what can be gained from having a mentor at this stage in your career:

  1. Perspective and Experience. A mentor can give you the benefit of his or her perspective and experience. He or she can help you assimilate to a new position and give you an insider’s view on how to get things done.
  2. Think Outside the Box. A mentor can help you look at situations in new ways. He or she can ask hard questions and help you solve problems.
  3. Define and Reach Long-Term Goals. A mentor can help you define your career path and ensure that you don’t lose focus and continue down that road even when you become distracted by day-to-day pressures.
  4. Accountability. When you know you are meeting with your mentor, you ensure that all the tasks you discussed in your last meeting are completed.
  5. Set Realistic Expectations. Idealism can be very detrimental to teachers. Think of a mentor whom you consider great. Seasoned professionals can share their failings and consequent learnings with their mentees. This will provide a foundation for accepting failures as inevitable and recoverable. Growth and learning are uncomfortable. Feeling that way is normal and expected. If you let them know it is going to happen, then it reduces fear.
  6. Trusted Colleague to Discuss Issues. A mentor can be a great sounding board for all issues—whether you are having difficulty with your immediate supervisor, an ethical dilemma, or need advice on how to tackle a new project or ask for a raise.
  7. Champion and Ally. A mentor who knows you well can be a strong champion of your positive attributes and an ally during any bumpy spots in your career. You get the insights and hindsight perspective that comes with first-hand knowledge.
  8. Expand Your Contacts and Network. A mentor can help expand your network of contacts and business acquaintances.
  9. Open Doors. A mentor can open doors within your company, in other companies, or onto a board.
  10. Inspire. A mentor whose work you admire can be a strong inspiration. A good mentor will positively impact your morale and engagement, leading to increased effectiveness in your current role.
  11. Work Better. With the help of a good mentor, you can work more efficiently with a clearer view of the future you are trying to achieve. This helps you feel more confident in your job, which leads to better job performance and more success along your chosen road.

Making the Most of the Mentorship Experience

How to Make the Most of a Mentorship Experience

  • Don’t just settle down for instructional mentoring. Instead, work on building fuller developmental relationships with mentors who help you build confidence and credibility within the workplace.
  • Don’t mistake mentoring and coaching with friendship. When selecting a mentor, choose someone you really respect and has the respect of the company you’re in.
  • When investigating new job options, talk to current employees and look at the company’s record of accomplishment in mentoring. Critically important is choosing the right environment.
  • Don’t be afraid to discuss race, ethnicity, and gender issues with your mentor, as these may significantly impact assignments, promotions, and perceptions about you within the workplace. Engaging your mentor in honest discussions can strengthen your lines of communication over the long-term.
  • Signal to the mentor that you’re willing to work around your weaknesses, that you don’t want to just be acceptable but exceptional.
  • Challenge your mentor to challenge you. If you’re stuck in a professional rut, seek your mentor’s guidance on opportunities that stretch your current talents and skills.

Realize that your development is ultimately your responsibility, whether or not your company offers formalized mentoring programs. But mentors will help you stretch yourself in ways that you might not have tried without their encouragement.

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Employees Must Have a Vested Interest in the Success of the Business

Robert Frost once said, “Isn’t it a shame that when we get up in the morning our minds work furiously—until we come to work.”

In the new economy, we need to equip people to think and act like owners. Everyone must come to work fully engaged and ready to make difference. A global revolution is under way, and it calls for gutsy leaders—people who can inspire knowledge workers idea merchants, and business innovator to exercise their own brand of leadership. The future belongs to those who use the power of culture to feed the entrepreneurial spirit.

Here are eight ways you can create a culture where people have a stake in the success of your business.

  • Employees Must Have a Vested Interest in the Success of the Business Recognize that ownership is more than a stock certificate. Ownership is a state of mind, a way of looking at the world and approaching work. Owners are people who step out from behind titles and job descriptions to act on behalf of the customer and the company. Non-owners hide behind position descriptions (“It’s not my job.”) and throw problems over functional walls (“Let me transfer you to…”) as an excuse for inaction. Owners cater to the purpose of the organization—its mission, vision, values, and strategy. Non-owners cater to the boss. Owners focus on the business results of their actions regardless of who is watching. Non-owners focus on the chain of command Owners ask the tough question: “How can we make it better?” Preoccupied with safety, non-owners gravitate toward the comfort of the status quo where things are more predictable and less disruptive.
  • Develop leaders who know how to liberate talent. Ownership is about giving people the freedom to act and removing the fears that cause lack of initiative. Unforgiving, zero-defect cultures foster cautious inactivity that kills the ownership mentality. People who don’t feel safe live under an umbrella of fear that makes them reluctant to make decisions, own problems, admit mistakes, take on projects, and act in ways that grow the business. When people cling to safety, they have no commitment to ownership; accountability vanishes, and self-preservation arises. Ownership is trusting that employees will operate with the company’s best interests in mind. Putting our trust in these people tells them that we think they are trustworthy. It suggests that we have faith in their character and competence. It boosts their self-confidence. Strengthen a person’s self-confidence and you strengthen his or her ability to think and act like an owner of the business. Herb Kelleher, Southwest’s chairman, says, “You build self-confidence when you give people the room to take risks and fail. You don’t condemn them when they fail. You just say, “We’ve just spent a good bit on your education; we hope to see you apply it in the future.”
  • Build a corporate culture of employee ownership Lay out the guiding principles. As a leader, you have to be confident that when the decisive moment comes, those who have assumed ownership will exercise common sense and good judgment. As the one assuming ownership, you have to be confident that what you are doing is the right thing because, after all, with ownership comes responsibility and accountability. Exercising good judgment and doing the right thing result from a clear understanding of the company’s guiding principles. Your firm’s business purpose and strategies, its mission, vision, values, and philosophy all define those principles. In essence, they create a set of helpful boundaries. When the boundaries are clear, employees have more freedom to step up, take action, and assume ownership for getting things done. When the boundaries are fuzzy, people get nervous and cautious. The result is a culture characterized by compliance instead of commitment.
  • Help people become business literate. When people understand how revenues and costs translate into profits, they become business literate. How many people on the front lines of your organization understand how the company makes money? How many of them are capable of reading a financial statement? If you asked them how much it costs to run their part of the business, could they tell you? How can we expect them to cut costs if they don’t know what those costs are to begin with? When people start asking cost questions, they are starting to think and act like owners of the business. The true experts are people at the point of action. Smart leaders open the books and equip these people with the financial information they need. When employees become business literate, they look for ways to drive costs down.
  • Make information relevant, fun, and interesting. The key to creating business literacy is getting people to internalize the information. If busy people do not see the information you put out as relevant, fun, and interesting, they are less likely to use it or be impacted by it. Information is relevant only when it is useful. If the salespeople at Sears knew that only three cents out of every dollar shows up as profit at the end of the day, they might be more passionate about watching costs and serving customers. Southwest Airlines’ annual profit-and-loss statement is written simply and illustrated with icons and cartoons, making it compelling to read and easy to understand.
  • 'The Truth About Employee Engagement' by Patrick Lencioni (ISBN 111923798X) Eliminate the “class” mentality. Leaders who are serious about leveraging the knowledge of every person must also eliminate the “class” mentality-socially prescribed or stereotypic boxes. This mentality undermines work in three ways. First, it strips the individual worker of his or her dignity and lowers morale. It essentially says, “We don’t believe in you enough to trust you with this information. It ensures that power resides at the top and widens the gap of inequality. Second, it doesn’t capitalize on people’s knowledge. The company pays for insight it never receives. Third, it crushes the entrepreneurial spirit. People stop caring, learning, and growing. When a financial statement is written so that only a CFO can understand it, forget about getting the frontline involved in a dialogue about cost containment. You breed compliance versus commitment. If your frontline people aren’t interested in reading a profit-and-loss statement, assess whether your information is too complicated or too mundane to capture their interest.
  • Show people how the business affects them personally. Most of the 18-year-old ramp agents at Southwest are business literate. They know that when they push a plane just 30 seconds late, that delay could translate into one hour and 45 minutes at the end of 11 flights in a day. Southwest would have to add 35 more planes at $30 million each to maintain its schedule. That could mean wage concessions, profit sharing, and lowered job security. They know how their job performance creates results, and how those results affect their lives. Southwest has made information relevant and interesting to its employees.
  • Give people a stake. Stock options and profit sharing can be powerful incentives to think and act like owners. However, just because people have stock options, they won’t necessarily think and act like owners. When you offer stock options and profit sharing without the culture to support these motivational tools it’s like putting new tires on a car that needs an alignment. When you add stock options and profit sharing to the rest of this list, you reward and reinforce people for behaving in ways that are consistent with an established culture. In doing so, you leverage the power of the incentive!

Build a corporate culture of employee ownership.

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Leadership Lessons from President Dwight Eisenhower

Leadership Lessons from President Dwight Eisenhower

President Dwight “Ike” Eisenhower, a graduate of the US Military Academy Class of 1915, set the benchmark for “Supreme Command” in coalition operations; the standards he articulated and personified in the 1940s continue to pilot senior military commanders. Even more profound than Eisenhower’s intelligence as a coalition commander was his impression in shaping state-of-the-art leadership principles for officers in militaries of a democracy.

One simple solution for surpassing limiting beliefs and making headway toward significant goals in our lives. Eisenhower knew what it took to lead soldiers and build cohesive units at the tactical level; he was passionate about leadership and leader development. Unity of Command was his simple establishing principle, but he knew that placing a single person in charge was insufficient to ensure unity. Today, leader advancement is the core mission component of the Academy.

Goals are about growing. A good goal causes us to grow and mature. That’s because every goal is about the journey as much as—even more than—the destination. And that’s exactly why setting goals outside the comfort zone is so imperative.

We gathered frequently in the dining room of Quarters 100—the elegant residence for 200 years of the Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point—for spirited conversation on history, politics, and leadership. As the Academy Superintendent in the late 90s, we relished this give-and-take. We brought to the Academy some of the best thinkers on leadership; the supper conversation reflected the energy of the participants. A recurrent question was this: “Whom do you regard as West Point’s most distinguished graduate?”

Dwight Eisenhower: History, Politics, and Leadership

The menu of alumni was a rich one: Grant, Lee, MacArthur, Goethals, Groves, Pershing, Bradley, Patton, and Eisenhower, among others. The agreement seemed always to focus on one graduate: Dwight D. Eisenhower, USMA Class of 1915, for his intense command of allied forces in the European theater during WWII. Eisenhower set the standard for “Supreme Command” in coalition campaigns; the principles he expressed and personified in the 1940s continue to channel senior military commanders.

Dwight D Eisenhower: History, Politics, and Leadership Lessons Even more profound than Eisenhower’s brilliance as a coalition commander was his influence in shaping modern leadership principles for officers in armies of a democracy. The strength of a memory is also determined by the emotional state that accompanied the original event. Without question, Eisenhower had no equal in stroking, cajoling, and managing prickly alliance personalities like Churchill, Montgomery, de Gaulle, Admiral Darlan, and Italian Marshall Badoglio—to say nothing of his challenges with George Patton. He was the consummate Supreme Commander.

The eloquent text above is simply for your benefit. It’s not actually part of the template. These beings are kenned by the adepts to be magnetized toward certain quarters of the heavens by something of the same abstruse property which makes the magnetic needle turn toward the north, and convinced plants to comply with the same magnetization. In such a way there is impermanent meaning and true meaning.

Fear usually plays a part in the decisions we make. Probably the biggest fear that you will have to face when making a decision is that of failure. Obviously, the bigger the decision, the greater the downside if it doesn’t pan out. Eisenhower also knew what it took to lead soldiers and build cohesive units at the tactical level; he was passionate about leadership and leader development. As a result of his submissions to Army leaders, Eisenhower influenced not only the formal leadership program of the U.S. Military Academy, but also the leadership ethic for young officers commissioned after 1945. Likewise, feelings, recognitions, volitions and consciousness are empty.

Dwight D Eisenhower: Situational Leadership

Dwight D Eisenhower Situational Leadership

Dwight Eisenhower’s leadership was is often a value judgment that varies from person to person and for one person from situation to situation. We call it situational leadership:

  1. Be mellow in manner, tough in deed: Eisenhower had a paperweight conspicuously exhibited on his desk with a Latin engraving meaning “gently in manner, strong in deed.” These are known as secret or insight activities. This reflected his philosophy and style. He was not full of bluster. He never threatened. This is the way of insight.
  2. Be a guide, not an initiator: Eisenhower once expressed leadership as “the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” This is the field of merit of beings. By vigilant organization and a premeditated crafting of words to hit the right note. When practicing, it is sufficient to just keep your mind on the method. He knew the importance of words— specifically those spoken by the person in charge—to motivate and persuade. There is another problem with the first cause argument. He believed in planning. He thought it was dangerous for a leader to shoot from the hip. We should take this to heart.
  3. Don’t talk too much: Even with no infirmities, the life of beings is passing. Some people just can’t help themselves and simply start prattling (luckily this didn’t happen to me). Either they’re nervous about figuring out the right thing to say, or they’re panicky about saying the wrong thing. And this full clarity is beyond inner and outer. But, when you talk too much the anguished person will sometimes begin to feel that they must take care of you.
  4. Know what you don’t know: Eisenhower cherished that his completest resource was not his own brilliance but the talent of his team. It frees a tremendous energy. He once wrote this piece of advice: “Always try to associate yourself with and learn as much as you can from those who know more than you do, who do better than you, who see more clearly than you.” And he understood that autonomy can be defined as the ability to make choices according to one’s own free will. He was a collaborator; and if no such challenge developed in that time, he would presume to be there by right, even though he might not have any life story.
  5. Don’t let success go to your head: Eisenhower never considered himself to be a hero when compared with the men who landed at Normandy and met the enemy on the bloodstained fields of battle. Soon after the war, he called on General Douglas MacArthur, his old boss, in Japan. MacArthur, impelled up about their success, crowed that as vanquishers either one of them could surely be elected president. It was reported that Eisenhower left that meeting red-faced and angry. He loathed the hero label. When years later he did become president, he was repeatedly disapproved for not being personally dynamic or out in front. He was lavish about letting those around him take the recognition for his ideas. This approach paid off in allegiance and execution. And many made great sacrifices to attend, frequently working his way through military.

In both arenas—supreme command and officer leadership—Eisenhower was a revolutionary. Before him, no U.S. commander had been entrusted with coalition command. General Pershing fought to maintain the integrity of U.S. forces as commander of the American Expeditionary Force in WWI, but he was subordinate to the French Commander-in-Chief; Eisenhower led allied forces from fall 1942, and by war’s end, had over four million men from five nations under his command. His approach to combined command complemented a sophisticated coalition leadership model—a model employed to this day.

Dwight Eisenhower: Unity of Command

Unity of Command was his simple organizing principle, but he knew that placing a single person in charge was disappointing to ensure unity. This had to be exercised through “earnest cooperation,” earned through “patience, tolerance, frankness, and honesty.”

Unity of Command: Leadership Lessons from Dwight Eisenhower Commanders in the 1990s, General George Joulwan in Bosnia and General Wesley Clark in Kosovo, achieved coalition success despite intra-alliance arguments by sticking to Eisenhower’s maxims. Similarly, two Central Command combatant commanders, Generals Norman Schwarzkopf and John Abizaid, profited from the trailblazing experiences of Eisenhower. Schwarzkopf exhibited a knowledge of alliance understandings and alliance politics by deftly managing more than 30 combination partners in Desert Storm. He clearly personified unity of command. But he knew this could never be effectively exercised unless he had consent of those he led, particularly his Arab partners, and most visibly, the Saudis. Again, Eisenhower’s coalition leadership principles proved decisive—and enduring. And they are reflected in the leadership exercised in 2005 by the Coalition Commander in Iraq, General John Abizaid, a student of the leadership of Eisenhower. After his discussion, his wish got him thinking about which of the three ways we die is actually best.

That these practices are connected with the proper kinds of beings and times is important. Besides transfiguring the doctrine of collective command at senior levels, Eisenhower was zealous about leadership development for junior officers. What he observed in the behavior of many U.S. officers in the European theater disturbed him greatly. Too many officers never identified with their soldiers; they were too eradicated from the needs of their troops. Further, Eisenhower was appalled by the behavior of officers who substituted screaming, even physical abuse of subordinates, for positive leadership. Eisenhower said, “You don’t lead by hitting people over the head; that’s assault, not leadership.” Life cannot be real if relationships are not real.

West Point Curriculum: Practical and Applied Psychology

Eisenhower felt that the West Point curriculum should include coursework in practical and applied psychology to “awaken the cadets to the necessity of handling human problems on a human basis,” and thereby improve leadership in the Army.

Eisenhower’s suggestion was soon followed by the establishment at the Academy of the Department of Behavioral Psychology and Leadership. For more than 50 years, it has instilled in cadets the principles of small unit leadership.

Instead of ignoring parts of the orchestra, a symphonic life of Dwight Eisenhower consists of five habits that ensure harmony:

  1. Anyone who has the self-control to steep his noetic conceptions in them may be sure that in a shorter or longer time they will lead him to personal vision.
  2. If your culture supports open dialogue and learning from mistakes, public commitments and public results can fire up morale.
  3. Contrary to the popular exhortation, people do judge books by their covers. That’s why it’s important we select the right one for this book.
  4. The moments of break-through where real change happens aren’t typically instant and extraordinary. They usually happen gradually in the ordinary course of our lives.
  5. One of the most obvious things about the future is that we are not there yet. The question for us as we start a small unit leadership is whether to drift or direct our lives where we want them to go.

U.S. Military Academy at West Point Today, leadership development is the core mission component of the Academy. The emphasis is on values, inspiration, and imagination. Eisenhower knew these could not be created in the cerebral equivalent of a strait jacket, with rote, mechanical instruction disconnected from the human problems of the individual soldier. In other words, we need to think about what we want to be true of us when it’s all said and done. Once that picture is in mind, we review the steps that journey requires and live them forward. Then comes the hard part.

The Supreme Commander who associated with his troops shaped the leadership ethic of my generation. Eisenhower took the time to write to parents of his soldiers, to talk to 101st Airborne Division paratroopers prior to their DDay jump, to prescribe leadership doctrine while he commanded millions. He was, in short, encouraging. And he personified the essential bond—trust. His soldiers trusted him because he exuded the values of integrity and respect—values that remain the core of our Army’s leadership principle.

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Adapting to Change and Managing the Transition Successfully

Life is about adapting to change and ever-increasing demands. William Bridges was right: “It’s not the changes that do you in. Ifs the transitions.”

Organizations must continually change. The question is “how?” The leader’s task is to make change work by helping others through transition.

A successful transition …

  • Explains what is and what isn’t over. Some things never change: You will continue to serve customers and produce products. What changes is not what you do but how you do it. Help people identify what is and is not over.
  • Respects the past. The practices that frustrate you today were someone’s innovative solutions of the past. Do not criticize widely accepted practices. Accept them as right for that time while recognizing that times change.
  • Ensures the “important stuff” continues. What is the important stuff to you? Service? Ethics? Whatever it is, it must continue. Involve others in defining the “important stuff” and ensure that the change does not disregard them. This increases support for the change.
  • Sets the stage for the future. Today’s change will open your eyes to new opportunities. As you evolve, set goals for what you want to achieve. Measure and evaluate progress. And, show others how the change will move them toward a positive future.
  • Recognizes its day will end. Don’t assume that today’s solution will work forever. And don’t think that this will be the last change.

Long-term success depends on anticipating and responding to change and making the transition.

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