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Marissa Mayer’s Office Hours at Google

'Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo' by Nicholas Carlson (ISBN 1455556610) For about 90 minutes a day, beginning at 4:00 pm, Mayer used to hold office hours at Google. She was a professor before she came to Google, and she kept office hours going. The much-vaunted “open office” for engineers, where bringing brownies increases a project’s chance of approval by 50%. Google’s Marissa Mayer cleared an hour and a half of her diary at the end of each day and staff could book an amount of that time by putting their name on a board in front of her office. This permitted her to supposedly fit a large number of very short meetings into a block of time where employees could come and talk to her about anything. Get-togethers which evidently emerged interesting product ideas counting Google News. A decent option perhaps than filling too much time up with the half hour/one hour blocks that managers tend to segment their calendars into, or to keeping an completely open door guidelines which might lead to excessively common interlude. Per this noteworthy anecdote from Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo by Nicholas Carlson:

Another Mayer habit that annoyed colleagues was one she picked up straight from academia. For many years at Google, Mayer insisted that if her colleagues wanted to meet with her, they had to do so during her “office hours.” Mayer would post a spreadsheet online and ask peopl~ to sign up for a five-minute window. When Mayer’s “office hours” rolled around in the afternoon, a line would start to form outside her office and spill over onto the nearby couches.

Office hours are socially-acceptable in an academic environment because the power dynamic is clear. The students are subordinate to the professor, who is usually their elder and mentor. But Mayer’s office hours were not just for her subordinates; they were also for her peers. So there, amid the associate product managers waiting to visit with Mayer to discuss their latest assignment or a class trip to Zurich, sat Google vice presidents—people who had been at the company as long as Mayer and in some cases held jobs as important as hers.

Posted in Management and Leadership

Building Rapport Using the Mirroring Technique for Effective Communication

For customer service providers, it is just as critical to listen as to speak

Building Rapport Using the Mirroring Technique for Effective Communication In customer service, is it more important to be a good sender of information or receiver? For customer service providers, it is just as critical to listen as to speak. Is there an art to being a good listener? Yes. Does it come naturally? I think not. In fact, research indicates that we hear half of what is said, listen to half of what we hear, understand half of it, believe half of that, and remember only half of that.

That means in an eight-hour workday, you spend about 4 hours listening. You hear about 2 hours worth. You listen to 1 hour’s worth. You understand 30 minutes of that hour. You believe only 15 minutes worth. In addition, you remember just under 8 minutes worth.

How important are the nonverbal aspects compared to the actual words we use when communicating? Your words are about 7 percent of your communication, tone of voice 38 percent, and body language about 55 percent, and yet, most communication training centers on the use of words.

Often we fake attention because our thought-to-speech ratio. We can think five times faster than the other person talking can. Now you can do something productive with that extra lag time in your thought-to-speech ratio.

Leadership consultant Tom Peters notes: “Good listeners get out from behind their desk to where the customers are.” Do you give your full attention to the people who talk to you? If not, learn a powerful, technique that will improve your listening and help you gain rapport with anyone you meet. This technique comes from the science of neuro-linguistics programming (NLP,) developed by John Grinder and Richard Bandler. By incorporating NLP into the way we work with people, we can “read” people more sensitively, establish a positive relationship more quickly, and respond to them more effectively.

Mirroring is the Art of Copying Another Person’s Behavior

Mirroring is the Art of Copying Another Person's Behavior Mirroring, one of several NLP techniques, is the art of copying another person’s behavior to create a relaxed communication situation. We tend to like people who are like us. If we look like someone (and 93 percent of who that person is, is nonverbal), they will subconsciously say to themselves, “I like this person. They are just like me.” In addition, if we like someone, we trust him or her and want to do business with him or her. Think about the potential this has for promotions, building business, and building relationships and friendships.

Specifically, this is how you mirror: First, match the other person’s voice tone or tempo. If they talk fast, you talk fast. If they talk slowly, you talk slowly. When I speak in New York, I cannot speak quickly enough. If I am in southern Texas, I slow my pace down to match their pace. One way to help you match the other person’s tempo is to match the other person’s breathing rate. Pace yourself to it. Match the other person’s body movements, posture, and gestures. If the person you’re mirroring crosses his or her legs, you cross your legs. If the other person gestures, you gesture. Of course, subtlety is everything. You may want to wait several seconds before moving.

The process of mirroring is natural. You do it naturally with people you like and have built rapport with.

Morton Kelsey said it well when he said, “Listening is being silent in an active way.” If you think of it, if you rearrange the letters in the word listen, it is equivalent to silent. We would be more effective in customer service if we would listen more and talk less.

I hope that this listening technique will help you gain much wisdom and that as a result, you will have to repent very little.

Posted in Education and Career Life Hacks and Productivity

Customers Expect Rewards in Exchange for Their Loyalty

'Customer Loyalty: How to Earn It, How to Keep It' by Jill Griffin (ISBN 0787963887) If you are over sixty, you may remember the thrill of filling S&H Greenstamps books and taking them to the redemption center.

That is how loyalty programs suck us in: we buy the things we always buy, but we get something extra. The more we buy, the bigger the reward. Today we expect loyalty programs to be part of our purchases, hence the popularity of frequent-flyer miles, supermarket discounts, merchandise rewards for credit card spending, and lower fees for maintaining higher bank balances.

But Loyalty Programs are Not Enough

You must offer a compelling value proposition and ensure that the customer’s experience is positive.

The financial value of a loyal customer is well documented. It costs a company to acquire (buy) customers with advertising, loss-leader items, and other incentives for initial purchases. If customers buy again, the company makes back its money. If they keep buying, more money is made. It becomes cheaper for the company to satisfy customers because repeat customers do not need as much support and understand the value of the brand. They even send new business. Therefore, companies need enticing ways of keeping customers.

You now have many options for incenting loyalty. You can offer discounts, provide points redeemable for free stuff, offer improved service (such as free shipping or fast turnaround), or priority treatment. As you look at your loyalty programs, determine which rewards appeal most to your customers—and then match the rewards to their desires.

Three Motivators for Loyalty

Three Motivators for Customer Loyalty Programs I see three reward programs, each supporting a different motivation for loyalty. Each motivation can be expressed positively or negatively:

  1. Reward/Greed. This is the “I get something for nothing” motivator. Flyer miles, and membership points are examples that appeal to people on a personal level. S&H Greenstamps recently reinvented itself as S&H Greenpoints ( Their motto is “Earn them on the things you buy. Spend them on the things that make you happy.” You now register as a Green–points user and collect electronic points for shopping at affiliated stores or Web sites. You redeem your points from an online catalog of products.
  2. Philanthropy/Guilt. Some customers react more on a community level. These customers respond most positively to loyalty rewards such as donations to charity. A good example is the affinity credit card. I have accepted credit card offers from banks because a small donation in my name will be made to my alma mater. You can get affinity cards for your favorite charity. It is a painless method of philanthropy because you do not take anything out of your wallet; the vendors with whom you do business give the money.
  3. Love/Obligation (or Fear). This loyalty program is targeted at customers who want rewards to serve them as a family rather than an individual. These customers also want relief from the financial burdens of family obligations. A new company that has endorsed this motivation for loyalty is UPromise. Its loyalty program makes donations in their children’s names to tax-deferred college funds when purchases are made from participating companies.

Most companies have a mix of customers with different hot buttons. You can offer different types of reward programs to appeal to each type of customer.

Dangers of Outside Loyalty Programs

Customers Expect Rewards in Exchange for Their Loyalty Loyalty programs provide rewards separate from the brand of the company sponsoring the rewards. In addition, there are dangers inherent in promoting outside brands as a bonus.

  1. More expensive to fulfill. When you offer a product from a different company, you may pay less than its list price, but the cost is still tangible, and you do not control it.
  2. Loyalty to the reward, not the brand. The biggest danger of offering rewards that are not part of your brand is that customers become more loyal to the reward system than to you.
  3. Held hostage to your loyalty program. As a company offering rewards you are, in some way, being held prisoner by your rewards provider.

As appealing as loyalty programs may be, they are not enough to keep customers coming back. Unless the customer finds value in your products and finds it easy and pleasant to do business with you, no loyalty program will work. You must have a compelling value proposition independent of any reward system. Your customers must value you! The loyalty reward is just a bonus.

Identify the motivators and incentives that appeal most to your target audience and customers.

Posted in Business and Strategy Management and Leadership

Leadership Lessons from Katharine Graham

Katharine Graham, renowned publisher of The Washington Post, spent 30 years overseeing and enlarging her media empire. Yet the rigidities of being CEO never discouraged her from the core mission of journalism, and she showed her responsibility by her actions.

The best leaders know that you cannot just talk about priorities; you have to exhibit what you care about by taking action. You can show your priorities in five ways:

  1. 'Personal History' by Katharine Graham (ISBN 0375701044) Get out of the office and into your employees’ ecosystem. Graham spent time in the newsroom each day. Ben Bradlee, the editor Graham hired who directed the paper through the Pentagon Papers and Watergate dramas, said that Graham had “round heels for reporters.” For her, “writing the first draft of history” (journalism) was at the center of her company. Employees felt she recognized their work because she observed it as it happened. In addition, Graham intensified her understanding of jobs in the newsroom by her direct observation, by listening, and by asking questions.
  2. Be proactive in building competence and knowledge. Graham held lunches for reporters in her private dining room, and welcomed experts for briefings. Journalists coveted being invited to these luncheons, which permitted them to deepen their knowledge of both their subject area and their publisher’s mentality. Once Graham brought in a psychologist to discuss personality disorders, notwithstanding the sensitivity she must have felt from her husband’s manic-depression and subsequent suicide. Graham carefully questioned the psychologist, and gave her journalists permission to explore the subject.
  3. Show that you are willing to jump in when needed. Graham built her resources by adding news bureaus worldwide, and boosted editorial budgets and staff, but she always saw herself as an operational part of the team. She would eagerly call in tips she picked up at social occasions and take excellent and extensive notes of speeches. During a violent press operator’s strike, which nearly shut down the paper, Graham lived inside the Post building. She did everything from taking classified ads to stuffing newspapers in bags, getting ink on her designer dresses. She was undeterred, and after the strike, directed the paper to its greatest financial success.
  4. 'Katharine Graham: The Leadership Journey' by Robin Gerber (ISBN 1591841046) Stand up for your employees. One Sunday afternoon Graham heard that the Chinese government ransacked the room of one of her foreign correspondents and held the woman for questioning. Graham did not pick up the telephone or ask for a letter of protest to be written. She put on her heels and single strand of pearls and drove to the Chinese embassy, marching up to the door and insisting on a justification. Her actions were not lost on her reporters.
  5. Follow your core convictions—even in small matters. In writing about Katharine Graham, Robin Gerber tried to get an interview with Warren Buffett, who had been Graham’s friend and mentor. In a final attempt, she sent Buffett the draft manuscript with a note saying that she hoped he enjoyed it. Two weeks later, he called her and talked about Graham, her leadership, and his relationship with her. He told Gerber about an occurrence he felt she had gotten wrong and gave her a quote for the book cover. Why did the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway take time to talk to Gerber? He could have dictated a note about the error, or asked his assistant to call. It is because the legacy of his friend is important to him. Devotion to relationships, identifying outstanding CEOs, and sticking with them has been a characteristic of Buffett’s success.

Leaders show their priorities through their actions. Think about how you are connecting to your staff through what you do, rather than through what you say. Make your actions fit your company’s mission and others will follow your lead.

Posted in Management and Leadership

How to Use Benchmarking as a Strategic Leadership Investment

Benchmarking in Strategic Management

Benchmarking is more than simply making a collection of statistical comparisons. If handled properly, the technique can be used to create significant efficiency improvements in your organization.

A company measures its performance against that of other companies to assess whether it standards are higher or lower.

Collecting snapshots of what that so doing, but failing to examine the reasons for differences in performance, and not using the data to identify and developing best practice.

Benchmarking in Strategic Management

There is little point in spending time and effort collecting comparative data for its own sake, or if managers use it is only to justify current standards.

There are five main stages to effect a benchmarking.

  1. Selecting aspects of performance that can be improved, and defining them in a way that enables relevant comparative data to be obtained—in effect, producing performance indicators that will make sense to other organizations.
  2. Choosing relevant organizations from which to obtain core or headline data
  3. Studying the state to improve possible opportunities for improvement.
  4. Examining the procedures of the best performing organizations to pick ideas that can be adopted or adapted to achieve performance improvements.
  5. Implementing any new processes.

'Benchmarking for Best Practices' by Christopher E. Bogan (ISBN 0070063753) In selecting performance indicators the call for in pieces of initial data collection, it is helpful to distinguish between input and output measures and, unpredictable, the place priority on the latter. It is often easier to define inputs and outputs. Examples of input measures include staffing ratios, per capita expenditure on training or, in manufacturing companies, the wearying proportions of labor, materials, and overhead costs.

The drawback with input measures is that they greatly provide an indication of the quality of outputs. Take, for example, the widely used indicator of response time to customer enquiries. This provides only part of the picture because it gives no indication of the quality of service. Apparently, good figures may conceal significant customer dissatisfaction, while longer response times may result in clients being delighted with the results.

Benchmarking for Strategic Leadership

Benchmarking for Strategic Leadership

Ideally, this practice involves high standards in both inputs and outputs. Indexes of customer satisfaction one form of output measurement. Some personal departments conduct surveys in which their international clients—the line managers—are asked to rate the quality of the various services provided by the Department. If other organizations conducting similar surveys can be found, these ratings can for part of a benchmarking study and may indicate areas where a change of procedures could lead to improvements.

There are two different approaches—genital and selective—are choosing organizations from which to obtain comparative data. The main purpose of the fourth month in is to produce a whole range of performance measures across an entire sector. Examples of general data sources include the government’s ratings of people performance in every primary school; the audit commission’s performance indicators for local authorities et cetera.

The state must be considered with caution. Misleading conclusions can be drawn from individual performance indicators when they are viewed in isolation.

Approach that is more selective is required when an aspect of performance and that requires attention has already been identified.

In this case, it is necessary to identify organizations of brought similar nature—preferably those with a reputation for effectiveness in the relevant activity.

With the topic-based benchmarking, it is possible to collect more data about a single issue than can be obtained from a general survey. It may also be feasible to ask but spends to supplement their answers by sending details of specific policies, such as copies of absence control procedures of performance appraisal guidelines.

Performance and Competitive Benchmarking

'Benchmarking The Search for Industry Best Practices' by Robert C. Camp (ISBN 1563273527) The purpose of obtaining benchmark data needs to be kept firmly in mind: identifying potential improvements in performance. Once such opportunities have been spotted, the more intensive aspects of benchmarking can begin.

The score beyond the study of comparative statistics and the documentation of other people’s procedures. They involve a detailed, on the ground study of the methods of high performing organizations. Understandably, this requires the full co-operation of the group concerned, though it is encouraging that many companies are willing to provide extensive information and facilities.

The organizations that have benefited from the suspect of benchmarking recommend the use of steady teams including staff from different functions and levels.

The final stage of the benchmarking process is the implementation of new systems. Here, it is important to recognize that the success of other businesses may be influenced by the motivational and cultural context in which their systems operate, as much as by the technical characteristics of the systems themselves. As a result, of the issues for steady teams to investigate is the nature of the homework environment—physical and psychological—in which best practice flourishes.

Posted in Business and Strategy

The Intrapreneur’s Ten Commandments

'The Entrepreneurial Mindset' by Rita Gunther McGrath (ISBN 0875848346) Gifford Pinchot III, the creator of the word intrapreneur created 10 commandments:

  1. Come to work each day willing to be fired.
  2. Circumvent any orders aimed at stopping your dream.
  3. Do any job needed to make your project work, regardless of your job description.
  4. Find people to help you.
  5. Follow you intuition about the people you choose, and work only with the best.
  6. Work underground as long as you can – publicity triggers the corporate immune system.
  7. Never bet on a race unless you are running in it.
  8. Remember, it is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.
  9. Be true to your goals, but be realistic about the ways to achieve them.
  10. Honor your sponsors.

Later Gifford Pinchot III added six more commandments,

  1. Ask for advice before asking for resources.
  2. Express gratitude.
  3. Build your team; intrapreneuring is not a solo activity.
  4. Share credit widely.
  5. Keep the best interests of the company and its customers in mind, especially when you have to bend the rules or circumvent the bureaucracy.
  6. Don’t ask to be fired; even as you bend the rules and act without permission, use all the political skill you and your sponsors can muster to move the project forward without making waves.

Gifford Pinchot - Intrapreneur's Ten Commandments Gifford Pinchot III is also the grandson of the first Chief of the United States Forest Service and the 28th Governor of Pennsylvania, Gifford Pinchot. The younger Pinchot has been distinguished for carrying on his grandfather’s work in environmentalism. In fact, Gifford Pinchot was an innovator of U.S. forestry and conservation and public official. With Theodore Roosevelt, Pinchot helped to found the Bull Moose Party in 1912. From 1923 to 1927 and from 1931 to 1935 he was governor of Pennsylvania. In his first term, he forced a restructuring of the state government and the establishment of a budget system. He settled a coal strike by mediation in 1923. Pinchot’s autobiography, Breaking New Ground, was published after his death in 1947.

Posted in Education and Career Management and Leadership

Six Megatrends of Retailing

Survive and Prosper the Consumer Megatrends

The New Shopping-as-life Model Has a Broad Competitive Perspective

As we enter the 21st century, the nature of shopping and the role it plays in life has changed dramatically. Shopping is about much more than feeding and clothing the family, it is about who we are, how we live, and how we spend our time. It is no longer about shopping versus life. It is about shopping as life. In fact, shopping has become so integrated into everyday life that consumers do it almost without thinking as they juggle family, work, and social activity.

How then do we manage this shopping life? We do it by being more efficient, smarter about our choices, and by blending shopping seamlessly into our lives, sometimes as a practical function and sometimes as entertainment, adventure, and emotional reward. We are shopping more at the outlets of choice and for more product categories.

Heighten the Emotional Quotient in Retail Branding

In the last four years, consumers have doubled the number of outlets they shop during their weekly shopping trips. However, they are not making more shopping trips, they are shopping more stores on each trip. The increase in outlets and categories shopped is partly due to the range of new, convenient, and affordable shopping options.

However, this increase in shopping is also driven by the level of shopping confidence and experience exhibited by female shoppers who willingly and eagerly shop everywhere.

Consumers have changed their weekly shopping matrix, overlaying the traditional supermarket with the increasingly accessible, discount-oriented mass merchandiser and the local convenience store. While three out of four American women still shop the local supermarket weekly, one-out-of two now shops a mass merchandiser once a week and one-in-five shops a drug store weekly. We now see the interrelationship between convenience and price. Retailers can no longer trade one for the other. Consumers demand both. If it is not conveniently located, reliable, and easy to shop, if the prices are not right, consumers will not integrate the outlet into their weekly shopping matrix.

One-in-two consumers of all ages shop at a mass merchandiser weekly (more than double five years ago). Mass merchandisers have affected supermarkets and caused declines in all outlets that compete with them.

Six Megatrends of Retailing

Six Consumer and Retail Mega-Trends

  • The Walmart-ing of America. This trend is not about mass merchandisers as a whole, it is about Walmart. Walmart has redefined the American consumers’ shopping experience and expectations. Stunningly, four-out-of-10 American female consumers now shop Walmart weekly. Walmart has become the benchmark against which American consumers evaluate not just the functional aspects of shopping (price, convenience, selection, service) but also the emotional experience of shopping. Not only is it the outlet consumers rate as the best place to get the lowest prices but also the place they look for what’s new.
  • The new value equation. Consumers now demand the functional aspects of convenience, price, selection and service as basic requirements of any and all retail outlets-be they discount-oriented national chains, catalogues, department stores or e-commerce sites. No longer can an outlet define itself by a singular functional dimension, such as low price, convenience or service. Today, all consumers demand convenience, good prices, selection (always in stock) as basic minimums wherever they shop. Now consumers view shopping as part necessity and part adventure, part pragmatism and part emotion. A retailer can no longer survive unless it satisfies consumers on both functional and emotional issues.
  • Retailers on the rise. Mass merchandisers are clearly leading the way as the outlet of choice. Not only do nine-out-of-10 primary shoppers of all ages and income levels shop a mass merchandiser quarterly but also one-out-of two shop there weekly! Mass merchandisers reflected the largest increases in consumers shopping for all the core categories they carry, with the exception of clothing. Mass merchandisers are now the primary outlet for all major beauty care categories, skin care, hair care, and cosmetics, overtaking department stores and drug stores, and second only to department stores in fragrance. As the big get bigger, the opportunity for the more concise, more personal, more specialized retailer grows. More consumers are shopping specialty stores in areas that did not even exist 10 years ago—in beauty care, hair care, skin care, fragrance, and cosmetics.
  • Retailers at risk. Retailers that fail to offer more than price or convenience or service are struggling to survive. Drug stores have become convenience store—places where Americans fill their prescriptions and pick up a container of milk. Seven of every ten consumers still fill their prescriptions at the drug store; however, the margins on the prescriptions have declined significantly in this era of managed care. Since 1996, the percentage of consumers shopping department stores has declined in all core categories with the exception of clothing. Most department stores focus on attracting younger consumers. However, they are not doing it as effectively as the specialty stores. The result? Older consumers with more disposable income are disenfranchised, and younger consumers are not compelled to make the department store their primary fashion outlet. The warehouse club is no longer the adventurous shopping outing. Other retailers have learned how to compete on selection and price. The result: the percentage of consumers who shop a warehouse club declined significantly. Supermarkets beware. Mass merchandisers have moved ahead of supermarkets as the outlet more consumers use.

The Demographic Divide Trends in Retailing

  • The demographic divide. While everyone is shopping more, younger consumers, 18 to 34 years of age, are driving the increases. Consumers 55 to 70 are shopping more selectively. This creates a demographic divide in retailing that has major implications, especially since consumers over 50 now represent 38 percent of the U.S. adult population and have 55 percent of the disposable income. When retailers and manufacturers concentrate on youth to the exclusion of older shoppers, older consumers stop shopping. They only replenish their basics. They spend their discretionary funds on investments, travel, computers, and their gardens, eating out—not on clothes, accessories, beauty products, home decorating products, or entertainment.
  • The truth about E-commerce. The outlook is clear: e-commerce will play an important role in retailing. However, today’s reality is that only 10 percent of primary female shoppers use the Internet as regular shopping alternative. E-tailing will have an impact on where consumers shop. The growth over the last two years has been dramatic. In 2000, 10 percent of respondents said they had shopped on-line in the last three months, up from five. The fact that one-in-four upper income women have embraced this new shopping outlet is an indicator of its potential.

How to Survive and Prosper the Consumer Megatrends

How can a company profitably capture the consumers’ attention and hold it when at every moment, on every corner, at every event there is an enticement to shop and spend. It is not just about opening more stores. It is not only about adding entertainment. It is not solely about offering e-commerce. What it is about is integrating a brand into the consumers’ life and embracing their lifestyle so that the outlet or product is indelibly inscribed in the consumers’ shopping life. Here are six keys for success:

  • Expand the landscape. It is no longer enough to present a singular concept in a singular landscape and assume it will satisfy your target customers and maintain their loyalty. Ensure that the real estate or the assumption that your target customer will shop there regardless because what you offer is so compelling does not limit the concept.
  • Increase share of consumer’s mind and life. Create multiple reasons for consumers to think of you for more. Once the consumer “buys” into the initial concept, they are encouraged to embrace you as part of their life and community—and thus buy more. By creating multiple layers of value, it is harder for a competing outlet to entice customers away.
  • Any way the customer wants it. Enable consumers to shop when, where and how they want since consumers can readily find somewhere else to shop. For consumers to keep coming back they need more than random access; they need to be assured they can count on you whenever they need you.

The Truth About E-commerce

  • Retail branding. Loyalty is built when consumers see and believe that the company reflects and satisfies both the practical and emotional tenor of their life, that it mirrors their attitudes and their sense of community, that it clearly resonates, “this outlet is like me and for me.” By creating a format—be it web site or store—with such affinity to a consumer’s life, it ensures that the consumer will stay true and loyal in spite of the shopping alternatives.
  • Heighten the emotional quotient. Pragmatism and functionality are merely the foundations of customer loyalty. Every company must provide convenient, easy-to-shop outlets, with a mix of merchandise always in stock at fair prices. What keeps customers coming back is the emotional bond they form with the outlet or brand. This is not solely about entertainment or novelty. It is about the trust and affinity customers feel a company offers them.
  • Recognize its global. The model against which you must evaluate your opportunities is global.

To build loyalty you need to establish a clear functional and emotionally satisfying matrix Study the trends and apply the six keys.

Posted in Global Business

Crowd Psychology

Crowd psychology is a branch of social psychology, focused on crowd behavior.

Crowd psychology is a branch of social psychology, focused on crowd behavior.

Theory on the behavior of crowds, going back as far as Plato, originally assumed that crowd behavior was that of an unthinking mob. Substantive study of crowds in the social sciences was reinvigorated by The Origins of Contemporary France (1875/1893), by the conservative historian Hippolyte Taine (1828-93). But it was in [[The Psychology of Crowds|Le Bon[The Psychology of Crowds (1895) that French sociologist Gustave Le Bon (1841-1931) first mined the writings of existing theorists on crowd behavior to create the new discipline of crowd psychology.

Le Bon listed th ree primary elements of crowd behavior, including,

  1. a unity of collective identification, giving a sense of limitless power;
  2. the creation of a sensitivity to emotional appeals due to that unity;
  3. collective intelligence in the crowd dropping to that of the lowest common denominator.

'The Wisdom of Crowds' by James Surowiecki (ISBN 0385721706) Crowds, said Le Bon, are easily subject to collective hallucinations, suggestions originated by individuals in the crowd that are thoughtlessly and contagiously adopted throughout the whole. Le Ban’s theory of crowd psychology received little significant challenge until the later works of sociologists such as George Rude (1910-93) and E. P Thompson (1924-93). Thompson’s studies of the actual behavior of crowds focused primarily on the social context and demands of crowds, while Rude looked at the composition of existing crowds. Their studies challenged views of the crowd as essentially primal and irrational, and instead showed crowds as often being composed of relatively better-off members of communities who are responding to specific threats to their communities, at the same time acting on cultural assumptions that are widely shared.

The study of the psychology and behavior of crowds had long been merely speculation before Le Bon, whose influential studies integrated the study of crowd behavior into formal social science.

Posted in Mental Models and Psychology

Learning and Productivity Compound Over Time

Mathematician and computer scientist Richard Hamming on how learning and productivity compound over time

How are some people more industrious and prolific than others? Are they merely smarter or do they just toil a bit harder than everyone else?

In 1986, mathematician and computer scientist Richard Hamming gave a talk at Bell Communications Research about how people can do great work, “Nobel-Prize type of work.” One of the characteristics he talked about was possessing great drive:

Now for the matter of drive. You observe that most great scientists have tremendous drive. I worked for ten years with John Tukey at Bell Labs. He had tremendous drive. One day about three or four years after I joined, I discovered that John Tukey was slightly younger than I was. John was a genius and I clearly was not. Well I went storming into Bode’s office and said, “How can anybody my age know as much as John Tukey does?” He leaned back in his chair, put his hands behind his head, grinned slightly, and said, “You would be surprised Hamming, how much you would know if you worked as hard as he did that many years.” I simply slunk out of the office!

What Bode was saying was this: “Knowledge and productivity are like compound interest.” Given two people of approximately the same ability and one person who works ten percent more than the other, the latter will more than twice outproduce the former. The more you know, the more you learn; the more you learn, the more you can do; the more you can do, the more the opportunity—it is very much like compound interest. I don’t want to give you a rate, but it is a very high rate. Given two people with exactly the same ability, the one person who manages day in and day out to get in one more hour of thinking will be tremendously more productive over a lifetime.

Thinking of investing your time and energy in terms of this compounding effect can be a very useful way to go about life. Early and rigorous investment in anything you are interested in cultivating—friendships, relationships, wealth, understanding, spirituality, know-how, etc.—often generates exponentially superior results over time than even marginally less effort.

Success begets success, and that counts for small investments, too.

Try to have “more experience” than someone else, but it’s not by itself enough. It’s about how well you can draw the appropriate lessons from the experiences. It’s about how well you can distinguish specific experiences as generalizable versus anomalies.

Knowledge Compounds

Someone once asked Warren Buffett how to become a better investor. He pointed to a pile of company annual reports. “Read 500 pages like this every day … That’s how knowledge works. It builds up, like compound interest. All of you can do it, but I guarantee not many of you will do it.”

Posted in Education and Career

Welcome to An Era of CEO Activism

Welcome to An Era of CEO Activism

Gone are the days when managers would shrink back from revealing their beliefs and viewpoints on matters that had little to do with their company’s routine endeavors.

Leaders should think carefully before jumping on the closest soapbox. Starbucks’s Founder and CEO Howard Schultz learned that the hard way in 2015 when he started the Race Together campaign in the aftereffects of the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Schultz inspired Starbucks baristas to converse about race relations with customers whilst serving them their morning coffee. That didn’t come down with easy. In due course, Starbucks dialed back the initiative.

  • Topic: Race relations. Starbucks’ Howard Schultz got into hot water after he launched Starbucks’ Race Together campaign which encouraged baristas to talk about race with customers.
  • Topic: Vaccination. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg incurred the wrath of anti-vaccine commenters when he posted a picture of his Infant daughter visiting the doctor for routine vaccinations.
  • Topic: Common Core Education. ExxonMobil’s Rex Tillerson aroused the ire of education advocates when he referred to American students as “products” that companies simply don’t want to buy.
  • Topic: Global Warming. Unilever’s Paul Polman has publicly maintained that businesses and governments should commit to environmentally sustainable practices.
  • Topic: LGBT Rights. CEOs of Salesforce, Apple, Intel, Dow, Bank of America, Facebook, Yahoo! and others have come out against a wave of anti-LGBT legislation in several states.
Posted in Global Business Leaders and Innovators Management and Leadership